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Until he extends the circle of his compassion to all living things, man will not himself find peace.

Albert Schweitzer, French philosopher, physician, and musician (Nobel 1952)

Media Won’t Talk About Meat Market Origin of Coronavirus

March 23, 2020
by

 


Source Jane Unchained
By Jane Velez-Mitchell



Lying by omission is one way to define “fake news.” By that definition, virtually all the mainstream coronavirus news coverage you are watching is fake. The networks essentially refuse to discuss the origins of the catastrophic coronavirus! Sure, you may hear news hosts make oblique and passing references to “live markets” as they urge you to hunker down in your homes and whip out the Lysol. But, that – obviously – does not tell the full story. The real story is: the abuse of animals in the food system is at the heart of this global debacle that is fast destroying our economy, killing a growing number of people and forcing millions of others to live in miserable isolation! This is, indeed, mother nature’s revenge. Not my phrase. That’s how an expert in zoonotic diseases described it.

I’m not always a fan of the New York Post. But, I must give them props for telling it like it is in their investigative story about live meat markets just like the one in Wuhan, China, where this pandemic began. Here is their description of the average “live market,” aka meat market.

“In stall after stall, a mix of live and dead animals, which run the gamut from the known (pig, ox, duck, chicken) to the rare or unknown due to the condition of the carcass — stare back at you. In the wet areas of the market — usually reserved for fish and sea creatures and where the ground is slick with water and often blood — the stink is worse. The animals that have not yet been dispatched by the butcher’s knife make desperate bids to escape by climbing on top of each other and flopping or jumping out of their containers (to no avail). At least in the wet areas, the animals don’t make a sound. The screams from mammals and fowl are unbearable and heartbreaking.”

Thank you New York Post for actually acknowledging the suffering of the animals involved. My question is: why are we not hearing similar, accurate descriptions from news anchors at the major networks? To talk about a global pandemic without consistently discussing its origins is like holding a murder trial and rarely mentioning the defendant. It’s irresponsible.

Experts believe that the virus originated in bats in China, animals ripped from the wild, kept in horrific conditions and then killed to be eaten. Here’s how NPR describes the insidious process: “Patients who came down with disease at the end of December all had connections to the Huanan Seafood Market in Wuhan China. The complex of stalls selling live fish, meat and wild animals is known in the region as a ‘wet market.’ Researchers believe the new virus probably mutated from a coronavirus common in animals and jumped over to humans in the Wuhan bazaar.”

OK, so props to NPR too. But, what about the more popular cable news networks? Why aren’t they  consistently connecting the dots between this hideous virus and the killing of animals for food? One answer may lie in what you see and hear in between the news segments. I’m talking about the commercials. Watch them! They are overwhelmingly advertisements for meat, dairy and pharmaceuticals. These happen to be the very industries that would collapse if consumers starting thinking realistically about the cruelty and bloodshed that goes into producing the ribs, burgers, wings, eggs, milkshakes and bacon that they have been conditioned to consume. Are American slaughterhouses much better than Asia’s live markets? There is still lots of blood, feces and body parts. No way around that. Meat doesn’t fall from the sky. The fact is: there is no nice way to kill someone who doesn’t want to die. Slaughter, by its very definition, is a nasty, grotesque business.

So, with the exception of some great special reports by NBC’s Richard Engel and 60 Minutes Australia, the news media continues to dance around the primal issue at the heart of this mind-boggling catastrophe, the likes of which we have never seen. News hosts question expert panel after expert panel, without ever having a full blown conversation about the horrific conditions at these markets and how meat markets are a global phenomenon and, therefore, a global problem. In case you didn’t know, there are dozens of live meat markets in New York City, for example. Some might argue… well, they don’t sell wild animals. But, is that really the point? And, do we really know that’s true? Frogs, turtles, rabbits… they’ve been spotted at some of New York City’s live markets. Could those be wild animals?

Now, it is time we ask ourselves: what is the cost of ignoring this essential aspect of the coronavirus story? If we do not learn from this monumental calamity, could we be bound to repeat it? Through our society’s willful ignorance, could we be setting the stage for something even deadlier? It’s not the first time a virus or disease linked to food animals has wreaked havoc. Remember mad cow disease? Remember swine flu, which is still ongoing in China, decimating millions of pigs before their body parts can be gobbled down someone’s throat? Remember the avian flu?  The philosopher George Santayana famously said, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”

That philosopher also said, “All living souls welcome whatever they are ready to cope with; all else they ignore…” Right now, we – as a culture – are still ignoring the truth staring us in the face: the killing of animals for food is having a devastating impact on our world. It’s a leading cause of human illness, meaning heart disease and cancer. It’s a leading cause of climate change, habitat destruction, wildlife extinction, water pollution and water scarcity. It’s a leading cause of human world hunger because animals eat so much more than they produce as meat or dairy. Now, add to the list, it is causing the most disruptive virus of our lifetimes.

When will the mainstream media have this conversation? Hopefully, before it’s too late.

 


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The media is a shill
For society’s ills
Lies of omission
A deadly tradition

Karen Lyons Kalmenson




Coronavirus and the karmic interconnectedness of humans, animals

March 16, 2020
by
Gestation_crate_(Farm_Sanctuary)

Gestation crate, Source Farm Sanctuary

 

Source The Hill
By Gene Baur

 

The COVID-19 coronavirus has killed thousands of people around the world, including 14 in the U.S., and its origin in animals and global spread should remind us how inextricably linked we are with other life on Earth. We share the same planet and breathe the same air, and we also exchange microbes including germs. Now, with our burgeoning human population and global economy, we face new threats from a wider distribution of diseases like this new strain of coronavirus.

For some background, the World Health Organization (WHO) explains: “Coronaviruses (CoV) are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV)… Coronaviruses are zoonotic, meaning they are transmitted between animals and people.” COVID-19 was thought to have come from a live animal market where animals are often sold as food in Wuhan, China in December 2019, and so far it has been confirmed in nearly 80 countries and declared a “public health emergency of international concern” by the World Health Organization.

No one yet knows how many people will be infected or die from COVID-19, but it has characteristics similar to the bird flu, known as the “Spanish Flu,” which killed millions during World War One.

SARS, MERS, and COVID-19 are contagious diseases that jump from animals to humans, and more needs to be done to curtail these, including banning live animal markets. But, other potentially fatal zoonoses also warrant attention.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warns: “…3 out of every 4 new or emerging infectious diseases in people come from animals.” These include viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites, and they infect millions of U.S. citizens every year.

In the U.S., almost ten billion animals are exploited and slaughtered every year. Most live short miserable lives in overcrowded factory farms, which are a breeding ground for disease, including emerging pathogens and virulent strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

In addition to foodborne illness and environmental pollution, animal agriculture can also incite global pandemics like H1N1, which was initially called “swine flu” because it was linked to a similar disease in pigs, but its connection to animal agriculture has since been largely obscured.

The H1N1 pandemic killed hundreds of thousands of people around the globe, including over ten thousand in the U.S., according to CDC: “From April 12, 2009, to April 10, 2010, CDC estimated there were 60.8 million cases (range: 43.3-89.3 million), 274,304 hospitalizations (range: 195,086-402,719), and 12,469 deaths (range: 8868-18,306) in the United States due to the (H1N1)pdm09 virus… Additionally, CDC estimated that 151,700-575,400 people worldwide died from (H1N1)pdm09 virus infection during the first year the virus circulated.”

While animal-borne illnesses continue to threaten human health, agribusiness has a vested interest in preventing consumers from thinking about it — under the oversight of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Since the 1980s, Farm Sanctuary has investigated farms, stockyards and slaughterhouses and worked to prevent irresponsible agricultural practices, such as the transport and slaughter of downed animals, animals too sick even to stand. T

he USDA defended the practice for decades, dismissing our concerns about diseased animals entering the food supply. Finally, after confirming mad cow disease in the U.S., the agency agreed that downed cows should not be slaughtered for human consumption. Unfortunately, however, other diseased and debilitated animals are still entering the U.S. food supply, including half a million downed pigs every year.

We continue challenging this inhumane and risky practice, and we are also challenging a new USDA policy to remove limits on slaughterhouse line speeds, and give the industry more authority to police itself. The USDA and other government officials need to protect the public, instead of serving the short-sighted financial interests of agribusiness.

Government programs should encourage diverse organic farms that build soil and create ecological sustainability and resilience, instead of chemically dependent mono-crops and factory farm confinement, which denude and despoil the earth.

We should invest in plant-based agriculture and grow crops to feed people instead of farm animals, which would feed more people with less land and fewer resources, allowing rainforests and other vital ecosystems to be preserved, along with biodiversity and the earth’s natural capacity for regulating greenhouse gasses and other environmental threats. We all benefit when our common home, the earth, is healthier.

Transitioning agriculture and government policies will take time, but each of us can make daily choices to help the planet and ourselves. Eating nutritious, plant-based foods can help fortify our immune systems, thereby enhancing our ability to withstand various threats, including from contagious viruses like COVID-19.

Our disrespectful treatment of other animals and the earth has consequences, and when they are harmed, ultimately, so are we. All life on Earth is connected, and it’s in our interest to act accordingly.

 

Gene Baur is the president and co-founder of Farm Sanctuary, a national farm animal rescue and advocacy organization.




Click HERE to go Dairy-Free

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Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

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This earth is here for all to share
All species everywhere
If kindness is the path you choose
Our earth will smile
We will never lose

Karen Lyons Kalmenson


Dissociation and Delusion on a Dairy Farm: A Former Farm Worker Speaks Out

March 9, 2020
by

1280px-Cedar_Point_animal_farm_baby_goat_(3004)

Source Wikimedia Commons, Bobby Proffer



Source Sentient Media
By Jessica Scott-Reid



Susana Romatz struggled to mentally cope with the demands of working on a dairy goat farm—like separating mother goats from their babies—until she said enough was enough.

Susana Romatz doesn’t consider herself to have been a farm kid, per se, but her grandfather did raise rabbits for meat. Looking back now, she says that navigating that as a child is likely what gave her the “skill-set for disassociating” early on. “I knew what he was doing with them, and it gave me that toolbox to shut that feeling off,” she says.

It was this ability to turn away from her emotions and instincts that would allow the animal-loving, on-and-off-again vegetarian to take work as a farmhand on a goat farm in western Oregon. It’s an experience, the now-vegan—and vegan cheese-maker—says she is still trying to heal from.

At the time, Romatz was a new teacher seeking additional work for extra cash. She wanted something outdoors and physical. That area of Oregon is considered quite progressive, she says. “Ethical,” “free range,” “organic,” products abound. So when a “humane” goat farm was looking for help, she says that she was on board. “I kind of started to buy into that line of reasoning, that you can keep an animal, do animal husbandry, in a way that is kind to the animals,” she recalls. It didn’t take long though, until “things started to disintegrate that idea.”

What made this particular goat farm—which produced milk and cheese and sold goats for meat—“humane” was that the animals were free-range. “They had a lot of land,” Romatz says, and the farm was “family-owned.” Romatz soon realized, though, that these things meant very little. “Just because it was higher up on the level of kindness to animals, compassion to animals, there were still some things that were really bothersome to me.”

At the top of that list, she says, was the disbudding of baby goats—kids—without anesthesia. Disbudding is a standard farming practice, done to stop the growth of horns, and purportedly to prevent property destruction and horn-related injuries. (Horn-related injuries to other animals commonly occur in confined spaces.) Without anesthesia, most animal welfare and rights groups condemn the practice, though it remains common.

“It was really horrifying,” she recalls. “They actually shrieked. [The farmers] would have to hold them down and basically burn off their horn buds with a hot electric poker.” She says some of the kids would never go near humans again. “It was one of the things I had to work really hard at shutting off. I had to not think about it. I could tell it was very, very painful.”

Romatz says that she tried justifying it to herself at the time by considering animal agriculture a trade-off. “With animal husbandry, there are trade-offs that you have to make when you are commodifying an animal, no matter how much you love them. You can’t capitalize on their bodies without making certain decisions that might be questionable,” she once believed. “When you are using animals in that way, you have to make those kinds of decisions,” to earn a financial profit.

But even as Romatz attempted to take a pragmatic approach—much like that of the farm owners—she always felt, in the back of her mind, that it was all very wrong. “The commodification of animals, milk, and bodies in that way, keeping the goats pregnant pretty much year ‘round, being fed grain [rather than their natural diet] year-round to keep them lactating, I knew it all had to be hard on the goats’ bodies.”

The separation of mothers and newborns also weighed heavily on Romatz. “The baby goats were taken away from their mothers almost immediately,” she says. In the dairy industry, mothers and newborn calves are routinely separated in order to reroute milk for human consumption. With the goats, Romatz says she was told by the farm owners that mothers needed to be separated from calves due to fears of a particular virus, the caprine arthritic encephalitis virus, transmitted through the mothers’ milk. (Administering blood tests to identify infected animals and removing them from the herd is also an effective solution.)

Romatz says that the calls between the moms and babies were indisputable. “This is something I would experience on a daily basis during kidding season,” she says, “when there were lots of babies kept in a pen, and lots of the does [mothers] kept in other pens, and you could hear them calling back and forth to each other.” Only the female kids were isolated, though, as the farm owners needed only them to stay healthy—so they too could become perpetually impregnated and lactating one day. The male kids were free to potentially become infected with the virus, she says, because they would be sent off to slaughter at two or three months old anyhow. “It was definitely sad,” she says, of the days the baby boys were sold, “knowing where they were heading.”

In order to mentally cope with with the work, which Romatz did for three years, she says, “you just keep shifting your bottom line, you keep shifting it, until you get to the point where you’re just like, ‘Wow, how was I even able to walk into that every day?’”

Eventually, Romatz left the farm to focus on teaching. She says that it was a relief to no longer have to mentally block out many aspects of her professional work. “All that work you’ve been doing to hold back those thoughts, you can’t do it anymore, and the flood comes, and then you can’t see it the same way ever again.”

Romatz went vegan two years after leaving the farm. After she and her partner rescued a dog, she says, “My partner just texted me and said ‘I can’t do animal products anymore,’ and it literally was so fast that I was able to switch. It took me maybe half an hour.” She says that it just felt right. “It was like everything just fell into place at that moment. All these little doubts and feelings I had been having all this time, and I had been fighting against them, or trying to convince myself—it’s that cognitive dissonance.” She recalls a “constant battle inside myself, doing things that were totally opposite from what my beliefs are.” When deciding to go vegan, “it was so easy for me to finally let all that go. [I realized] that was all an illusion, that was a lie to get me to spend money, a lie to get me to stop looking further into this.”

Her bottom line, she says, immediately rebounded.

Now, Romatz feels a sense of wanting to make up for her past. In addition to being vegan, Romatz is a vegan cheese advocate, of sorts. Out of necessity, she began making her own vegan cheeses, using locally grown hazelnuts and special vegan cultures that she created herself. The cheese is very labour-intensive and expensive (she notes that nut farms are not subsidized in the way dairy farms are) so, for now, Romatz only makes cheese for family and friends. Romatz has a great desire to educate others; she sells her vegan cultures online and provides information and recipes on her website—“to give other people the tools to make these cheeses themselves.”

As for the owners of the goat farm, which is still in operation today, Romatz says, “they aren’t bad people.” They just see things differently. “It was just the older [farmers’] view that animals are more like property,” she says. “They took care of the animals to the degree they needed to [be profitable].”

Romatz believes that the bombardment of messaging—from media, culture, tradition, and family—enables some of us to “become disassociated from the reality of what you are actually experiencing.” She says that it took her a few years before she could really understand all that she experienced on the farm, “before I could allow all the things that had happened there to start to soak in, to realize how I had tricked myself to be able to work there.”

Today, Romatz says she is moving forward, but will never forget the animals of her past. “I’m really trying to respect the lives of the animals who have come and gone. But in understanding and moving forward, you don’t have to necessarily dive into the trauma of the past; you have to understand it and notice it, but you don’t have to beat yourself over it. Thinking about [my experiences] and also moving forward have been very important to me.”



Click HERE to go Dairy-Free

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Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

PETA: https://www.petaliterature.com/

Vegan Outreach: https://veganoutreach.org/order-form/

Get your FREE Activist Kit from PETA, including stickers, leaflets, and guide HERE



we applaud all those who
choose to evolve
those whose lives around
kindness,
revolve.

Karen Lyons Kalmenson




Test Subjects

March 2, 2020
by


Source Test Subjects , Alex Lockwood



Frances, Emily and Amy were all aspiring scientists, looking forward to a future in which they could make a real difference to human health. Testing on animals, they had felt, was a necessary part of their research. These three scientists all slowly came to question the validity of animal testing and now look to share their stories.

Find out if your university tests on animals HERE

Free dissection alternatives for all education levels HERE





Order a FREE vegan kit: http://www.peta.org/living/food/free-vegan-starter-kit/

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Searching for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics, Personal-Care Products, Vegan Products, or more?
Click HERE to search.

Click HERE to find out How to Wear Vegan!

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

PETA: https://www.petaliterature.com/

Vegan Outreach: https://veganoutreach.org/order-form/

Get your FREE Activist Kit from PETA, including stickers, leaflets, and guide HERE

Have questions? Click HERE




We stand in defiance
Against pseudoscience

Karen Lyons Kalmenson


Please sign four petitions

February 24, 2020
by
animal_wrongs__by_atomic_ellie
 Artist Atomic Ellie



Please sign the following petitions from OC friends, thank you:

1. Support legislation to end cosmetics testing on animals: Please sign HERE

2. Tell Syracuse University to punish students who commit hate crimes, not peaceful protestors: Please sign HERE

3. Help to remove all YouTubers and videos of Animal Abuse/Cruelty from YouTube: Please sign HERE

4. Support humane science, support HEARTS: Please sign HERE




Order a FREE vegan kit: http://www.peta.org/living/food/free-vegan-starter-kit/

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Searching for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics, Personal-Care Products, Vegan Products, or more?
Click HERE to search.

Click HERE to find out How to Wear Vegan!

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

PETA: https://www.petaliterature.com/

Vegan Outreach: https://veganoutreach.org/order-form/

Get your FREE Activist Kit from PETA, including stickers, leaflets, and guide HERE

Have questions? Click HERE

 


Please sign and share, everywhere

Karen Lyons Kalmenson




In Response to Harriet Hall: The White Savior is You, Not Joaquin Phoenix

February 18, 2020
by

Source Christopher Sebastian



Like many people I woke up to the news on Monday that Joaquin Phoenix had made a sweeping speech when he accepted his award for best actor at the 2020 Academy Awards ceremony, and like many people I was moved that he spoke so eloquently about injustice for all marginalized persons including animals. I was, however, disappointed to read Harriet Hall’s hot take the next day in the Independent. Disappointed, but not surprised.

When you have been standing at the crossroad of black liberation, queer liberation, and animal liberation for any amount of time, you know all about the difficult task of convincing allies of social justice that institutional violence against animals and humans does not occur in a vacuum.

The fact that Hall characterized Phoenix’s speech as a “galling juxtaposition” reveals her bigotry toward the other persons with whom we share this planet. The perceived exceptionalism of humans in relation to other animals should be the thing that galls her, not Phoenix’s recognition of it. But the myth of our supreme right to dominate everyone else is persistent, and it replicates the very hierarchy I presume Hall wants to dismantle.

In response to online attempts to educate her, Hall very condescendingly stated, “I’ve been a vegetarian for 15 years and take animal welfare extremely seriously – but comparisons like these do no one any favours and only undermine all points being made. By all means he could have made them separately, but lumping them together was my problem.”

Her problem was lumping them together? I hate to break this to her, but in the words of Yolo Akili, author of Dear Universe: Letters of Affirmation and Empowerment, “Oppression thrives off isolation. Connection is the only thing that can save us.”

Furthermore, Hall presents her vegetarianism as some sort of misguided allyship. But that allyship earns Hall no cookies. Vegetarianism still robs chicken and cows of their reproductive autonomy. Vegetarianism offers no prohibition against violent exploitation of animals for entertainment or fashion. Hall would be well served to read the tireless work of Carol Adams who penned The Sexual Politics of Meat some 30 odd years ago to learn what ecofeminism can teach us about that.

And by shifting the focus to animal welfare, Hall conceals the necessity for animal liberation because welfare relies on the notion that we are entitled to others’ bodies as long as we treat them nicely. Such badge allyship is as fraudulent and toxic as that which white women have been serving up to black people since the dawn of western civilization.

Badge allyship allows co-conspirators to appear sympathetic while holding the perpetrators’ boot in place. It is the illusion of solidarity by altering the material conditions of our marginalization instead of removing them altogether. Animals care about as much for her token concerns toward their “welfare” as I do about her performative outrage on my queer and black behalf.

Hall also inaccurately states that Phoenix compared marginalized groups to bovine animals. That’s not what happened. It is perhaps Hall’s own bigotry that triggered such a kneejerk response. Phoenix merely recognized bovine animals as marginalized persons themselves. It is only insulting to the bigoted imagination that someone should even consider bovine animals to be marginalized persons at all.

But here lies the biggest plot twist. Even if Phoenix did make such a comparison, he wouldn’t be the first. Just two days ago, Chuck Sims Africa was released from prison after an unconscionable 40+ years of incarceration. He was the final member of the radical Philadelphia-based MOVE organization to be paroled. MOVE was a revolutionary black liberation group that advocated for total liberation for all persons, including animals.

Ed Pilkington wrote for the Guardian in 2018, “Black liberation, animal liberation – the two are as one with Move.”

In the same piece, Pilkington shared the words of MOVE’s own Janine Africa, “We demonstrated against puppy mills, zoos, circuses, any form of enslavement of animals. We demonstrated against Three Mile Island [nuclear power plant] and industrial pollution. We demonstrated against police brutality. And we did so uncompromisingly. Slavery never ended, it was just disguised.”

Is Hall equally offended? Is she still galled?

Hall invokes “the injustices of racism, of the experiences of people of colour whose history is steeped in slavery” to express how it trivializes our experiences to recognize that they are shared. But it is dishonest virtue signaling at best, and willful weaponizing of oppression at worst.

Hall condemns Phoenix for mentioning “queer rights, when members of the gay community have been beaten, criminalised and banned from marrying their partners.” Yet it seems that Hall is completely ignorant of the tireless work of authors like pattrice jones, who has written and spoken quite extensively about queering animal liberation.

Could Phoenix be criticized for not elevating the voices of marginalized people who have been saying the same thing for years? Maybe. But we also have criticized straight white men for not doing the work of educating other privileged people like themselves instead of locating that burden on us. In the moment of his speech, Phoenix did exactly that.

It is a great irony that Hall considers Phoenix to embody white savior complex. While there is no shortage of it in the movement for animal liberation, today the only white savior in the room is Hall. So since Hall is so quick to offer pro tips, here’s one for her: Ms. Hall please do the homework assignment before coming to class. The body of literature to educate so-called allies on the commonality of oppression is vast. You may speak for other oppressed people who share your contempt for other animals, and that is indeed your privilege. But you do not speak on behalf of all marginalized people. If you have no desire to go about the work of collective liberation, that’s fine. But please get out of the way for those of us who are doing it.

I lose nothing by expanding the scope of my justice to include other animals. Unfortunately, doing so may cause Hall to lose a glass of milk. I hope that doesn’t distress her too much. After all, several scholars have observed the link between milk and white supremacy, a point that might be lost on Harriet Hall, although such shared oppression was very literally the point made by Joaquin Phoenix.

 

Author’s note: I submitted this to the Holly Baxter, the opinions editor at the Independent who commissioned Hall’s piece. She unfortunately did not respond. But she did, however, have time to rebuke and then literally silence everyone on Twitter who disagreed with her and Hall. So here’s a second pro tip: As a white woman speaking on behalf of marginalized people, you would do good not to shut us down when we speak for ourselves. And do not center yourselves in discussions by crying white woman tears about how badly you’re treated as an ally. Your white feminism? It’s showing.

 

Literally commissions someone to “destroy” an ally…complains on Twitter when held accountable for it.





Order a FREE vegan kit: http://www.peta.org/living/food/free-vegan-starter-kit/

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Searching for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics, Personal-Care Products, Vegan Products, or more?
Click HERE to search.

Click HERE to find out How to Wear Vegan!

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

PETA: https://www.petaliterature.com/

Vegan Outreach: https://veganoutreach.org/order-form/

Get your FREE Activist Kit from PETA, including stickers, leaflets, and guide HERE

Have questions? Click HERE




Ism
Schism
Sabers rattle
We who should stick
Together
Then we would
Win the war
And many more
Battles

Karen Lyons Kalmenson

Why Are We Still Talking About Factory Farming?

February 10, 2020
by



Source Free From Harm
By Robert Grillo



As I was preparing to speak on a panel on the subject of so-called “factory farming,” I felt compelled to question what this powerful slogan even means. My first thought is that it serves to make some kind of important distinction between large scale farming and some kind of viable, ethical or sustainable alternative.  And I feel compelled to question the very premise of this slogan and ask the audience to think more deeply on it. So here are some thought experiments I came up with for the audience.

If I were to describe an egg hatchery that could hatch thousands of chicks a day, most of us would we call this a factory farm? Yes? We’d have to go back 3,000 years in history to ancient Egypt to find this example.

If I were to describe a method of breeding that involved weeding out and mercilessly killing off thousands upon thousands of weak, deformed, injured and diseased animals and only breeding the strongest individuals, or those with certain traits that farmers find desirable for greatest productivity, would we call this a practice that defines factory farming? And yet this practice has been going on for hundreds of years, long before modern farming.

If I were to describe chickens who lay their entire body weight in eggs every 24 to 30 days during their egg laying prime or dairy cows that have been engineered to produce far more milk than what nature intended to feed a single calf, would we call this a practice that defines factory farming?

If I were to describe the mass disruption of ecosystems through the mass slaughter of wildlife, at times to the point of extinction of certain species, wildlife who present either a nuisance or a threat to raising domestic animals, would we not consider this an example of factory farming? And yet it is a practice that goes back thousands of years.

Please read rest HERE





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Ignorance is voluntary stupidity

Karen Lyons Kalmenson




Dairy’s ‘dirty secret’: it’s still cheaper to kill male calves than to rear them

February 3, 2020
by
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Source One Green Planet

 

Please note the use of euphemistic terms and phrases such as “early disposal”, ie., killing infants; “it”, ie, a male, him. Please also note a serious lack of ethics or consideration for sentient beings and the “victimized” farmer who is unable to kill the calves herself but has no issue with hiring others to do so.

Please never forget that caring does not equal killing, if farmers cared for the animals,  they would not exploit or kill them; there is no legitimate way to consider the well-being of an animal if you exploit and kill him/her. Terms such as “red tractor”, “high welfare”, “cage-free”, etc., are phrases meant to console human conscience, while animals are still exploited: subjected to confinement; inflicted with mutilations; separation of mother and child, causing extreme distress and psychological trauma; stealing of milk for other species; and abbreviated lives ended in violent death.

Here’s your dairy:


Source The Guardian



Dairy farms need female cows to produce milk but with little demand for male calves many farmers can’t afford to keep them beyond birth

The number of male calves being killed straight after birth is on the rise again, despite efforts by the dairy industry to end the practice known as ‘the dirty secret’.

A Guardian analysis shows that it can cost a farmer up to £30 per calf to sell it on for beef or veal, while early disposal costs just £9. A growing number of farmers feel compelled to take the latter option, with 95,000 killed on-farm in the most recent set of figures.

Dairy farms depend on female cows to produce milk, so when male calves are born, they are surplus to requirements and farmers are currently faced with few options.

They can immediately dispose of the calf, either by shooting it themselves or contracting a knackerman to do it [licensed slaughter business that will kill or collect dead farm animals]. They can sell the calf to be raised for veal or beef. Or they can sell the calf for live export. A few farms are experimenting with keeping the calves with the mothers for longer, but this is an expensive and rarely chosen option.

Early disposal is known as the ‘dirty secret’ by farmers, and none relish it. But keeping the calf to sell on to be raised for beef or veal means the farmer will have to rear them for two to four weeks to a good enough weight to interest buyers, at a typical cost of around £2 a day, with selling prices at market as low as £25-40. This doesn’t include extra costs such as getting the calf to market, registering its birth or veterinary bills.

In contrast, shooting the calf costs as little as £9, including the cost of the knackerman who will incinerate the body, or in some cases send them to kennels to be turned into dog food. Calves shot on farm cannot enter the human food chain and farmers can only dispose of calves themselves if they have a licensed incinerator.

Dairy farmers in the UK have been under extreme pressure to cut costs for the last two decades, with milk long used as a loss leader by supermarkets to draw shoppers into their stores. “Some farmers might do the maths and figure out after rearing, transport and time away from the farm it might not add up,” says Chris Dodds, from the Livestock Auctioneers’ Association (LAA).

The estimated 95,000 calves disposed on-farm represents 19% of the male dairy calves born, according to the most recent figures from the dairy industry body AHDB. In 2013 the number had fallen to 13% of male dairy calves born from a previous 21%. The exact numbers shot on farm is difficult to collate as farmers destroying calves within a few days of birth on farm do not need to register the birth – and neither does the company collecting and disposing of the animal.

One dairy farmer, who asked to remain anonymous, explained to the Guardian that she could not find a market for her male calves. “This year we’re shooting the Jersey crosses, because we’ve not got the space or money to keep them. It doesn’t make me feel good.

“We get the knackerman out to do it. I could never do it. I can’t even feed them if I know they are going to be dead in a few days.” She said the issue was still “kept under the carpet” by the wider food and farming industry and that consumer markets needed to be developed and farmers financially supported to rear the calves.

Another farmer told the Guardian: “I shoot black and white bull calves [the Holstein Friesian breed that predominates the dairy sector in the UK], but am still not hardened to like doing it. We have too many calves here. The space available on the farm [an 800-cow dairy herd] is only suitable for a maximum of 80. The less calves I have the better for the overall farm. This is a business and it has to be financially viable to make it worthwhile.”

A joint NGO, retailer, farming and government initiative to promote markets for bull calves, that closed in 2013, estimated more than £100m was being lost from calves killed before realising their economic worth.

The alternatives to early disposal are not simple. Half a million calves used to be exported from dairy farms via ferries to the continent, which has a larger market for veal.But public protests and industry pressure against animals being sent on long journeys in lorries and lower animal welfare standards in other countries has seen that outlet largely disappear. No calves were exported from England last year, although an estimated 5,000 calves did leave from Scotland and a further 20,000 from Northern Ireland.

Attempts to promote a market for high welfare British rosé veal, championed by the likes of Jamie Oliver and Jimmy Doherty, have met with mixed success with margins for farmers tight and consumer interest low. The RSPCA is calling for the food industry to be allowed to rename veal as rosé beef to end consumer misconception of it as a white meat produced from calves kept in crates and fed milk – a system that was banned in the UK in the early 1990s.

Another alternative is to rear the calves for longer and sell them as beef. One of the companies doing that is Buitelaar, set up in 2006 and which collected more than 35,000 calves from dairy farms across the UK last year. It arranges for them to be reared indoors on a mixed diet and then sold after 12-14 months through UK supermarkets, restaurants and fast food chains. But some breeds such as Jersey cows are not seen as suitable for this option.

There has been a steady growth in the use and effectiveness of sexed semen since the early 1990s, accounting for 18% of total semen sales in 2017. It increases costs for farmers but can reduce the proportion of male calves being born to less than 10%.

Supermarkets could play an important role in reforming the situation and providing a market for meat from bull calves. Tesco, Aldi, Iceland, Lidl, the Co-op and Asda do not ban their milk suppliers from shooting bull calves and it is not outlawed under organic standards. But some of the large chains – the Co-op, Morrisons, Sainsburys and Waitrose – have launched schemes, in conjunction with beef companies such as ABP, Buitelaar and Dunbia, to collect calves and ensure they are reared rather than destroyed.

The National Farmers’ Union (NFU) warns that post-Brexit trade deals could make it harder for farmers to find a market for male calves. “A trade deal that allows cheap beef from countries with lower standards of production will most definitely damage many of the positive initiatives that have been developed over recent years to utilise dairy bull calf beef and veal within the UK market,” said NFU dairy advisor Siân Davies.

A small number of dairy farmers are experimenting with trying to make more use of the bull calves. David Finlay, who runs Cream O’Galloway, one of the UK’s largest “ethical” dairy farms in southwest Scotland, keeps his male and female calves with their mothers for the first five months. The male calves are then reared separately before being sold to a veal producer at eight months.

He loses a large proportion of the milk produced by the female cows, but says his use of a dual purpose breeds of cows (good for milk and meat) means he gains a better market price for the animals. “The message coming to farmers from their peers and the industry is still to chase litres at all costs. But if you are chasing milk there will be a cost in terms of bull calves.”



Click HERE to go Dairy-Free

 


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how do people such as this guilt free, live
how do they sleep
while the compassionate,
weep!!!

Karen Lyons Kalmenson




Do People Care About the Other Crisis Killing Koalas & Kangaroos?

January 27, 2020
by
koala-being-syringe-fed-in-hospital-768x432

Photo: Saeed Khan/AFP Getty Images

Source Free From Harm
By Ashley Capps



As Australia’s unprecedented bushfires continue to rage, heartbreaking images of scorched koalas and charred kangaroos have devastated viewers around the globe. An estimated 1 billion or more animals have died in the fires, but it’s the pitiful photos of flame-chewed koalas being carried from the blaze like bewildered, beat-up babies that have perhaps most captured our collective sympathy and despair; along with the images of beleaguered kangaroos, their normally genial silhouettes frozen in panic against a backdrop of roaring orange.

It is unbearable to witness.

Thankfully, these same images have also inspired millions of people to donate to rescue groups on the ground retrieving animals from the fires and tending to their injuries. But as the surge of combined sorrow and sympathy for these iconic animals swells around the world, I find myself wondering: What about the other crisis that is killing Australia’s koalas and kangaroos, and in even greater numbers?

The World Wildlife Fund reports an estimated 45 million animals are killed each year in the Australian state of Queensland alone just from bulldozing of their habitat, a crisis they note is driven primarily by the livestock industry.” In just 4 years, between 2012 and 2016, bulldozing of trees killed at least 5,183 koalas in the state. Queensland RSPCA’s Mark Townend notes, “The mass suffering, injury and needless deaths of wild animals caused by the bulldozing of their forest homes is largely hidden but it is Queensland’s greatest animal welfare crisis.”

Queensland had the largest koala population on the continent in 1990, with an estimated 295,000; but in just 20 years that number decreased by more than 40%, while on the Koala Coast, 80% of these animals have been lost. Thousands of koalas continue to be killed each year as more forests are cleared for cattle grazing in response to consumer demand for beef. But it’s not just Queensland. In Australia as a whole, “beef cattle production is the major driver of tree-clearing.”

Millions of Kangaroos Killed for Burgers & Beef

The same industry is also terrorizing and destroying kangaroos en masse. Since the year 2000, an average of more than two million kangaroos per year have been shot by commercial shooters for the meat industry.

Please read rest HERE





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this tragic loss of life is harder to deny
when the staggering numbers
are posted daily before
our eyes.

Karen Lyons Kalmenson


John Sanbonmatsu: Why ‘fake’ meat isn’t

January 21, 2020
by

Ripple_chocolate_pea_milk

Source Wikimedia Commons, Vegan Ripple Milk



 

Source St. Louis Post Dispatch
By John Sanbonmatu



Is it fraud to sell “veggie burgers”, “chickenless nuggets”, or “tofu dogs”? What about to call a beverage made from soy beans “soy milk”?

According to the meat and dairy lobbies, it is. Alarmed by declining sales of dairy and beef and by growing interest in veganism, agribusiness has been pushing legislation to outlaw the use of “meaty” and “milky” words in the marketing of plant-based foods. Last year, Missouri enacted a “real meat” law, making it illegal to sell plant-based products using meat-like words. Louisiana and Mississippi passed virtually identical bills last summer, and similar legislation is pending in half of the nation’s states.
Backers of the new bills claim that referring to plant-based foods as “meat” or “milk” is unprecedented, and therefore deceptive. However, it is they who are deceiving the public — by ignoring a thousand years of past English usage.

Only in recent decades, in fact, have we come to associate the word “meat” exclusively with the flesh of animals. The word derives from the Old English mete, for food, nourishment or sustenance. As late as the 1970s, the Oxford English Dictionary still gave the primary definition of meat as “food in general: anything used as nourishment for man or animals; usually solid food, in contradistinction to drink.” Meat was therefore synonymous with “meal, repast, or feast.”

Once common, now archaic terms listed in that dictionary include “meat-giver” (one who provides food), “meat-while” (“the time of taking food, meal-time”), and even “meat-lust” (signifying not an erotic attachment to bacon, but merely “an appetite for food”). Even “meatless” (a word we now associate only with vegetarianism) for centuries merely meant to be “without food.”

Potatoes, too, were considered meat, as were “crumbled bread and oatmeal.” A child sent to “collect meat for the cattle” would have been asked to gather provender, not carcasses. “Green-meat,” as it was termed, referred to any “grass or green vegetables used for food or fodder,” whether consumed by humans or domesticated animals. Similar usages of plant meat remained common into the early 20th century.

“Meat” has also long been used in its more restrictive sense, to refer to animal flesh. But again, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, it was more common for “meat” to refer to “the edible parts of fruit, nuts, eggs, etc.; the pulp, kernel, yoke, and white, etc., in contradistinction to the rind, peel, or shell.” Hence the still common expression, “getting to the meat of the matter.”

Why this broader usage? Because for most of human existence, flesh has played only a supporting role in the human diet. Vegetables, fruits, grains, nuts and legumes have oftentimes provided the bulk of our nourishment. It was bread that our ancestors called “the staff of life,” not chicken or pork.

A similar falsification of the history of English usage is now occurring too with “fake milk” bills. In April, the Louisiana Legislature, under urging by the Louisiana Cattlemen’s Association, passed a bill making it illegal to sell as “milk” anything that doesn’t come from a “hooved mammal”.

The Food and Drug Association proposes that milk be defined as the “lacteal secretion … obtained by the complete milking of one or more healthy cows.” Chris Galen, vice president of the National Milk Producers Federation, has similarly stated: “You don’t got milk if it comes from a nut or a seed or a grain or a weed.”

In fact, referring to the secretions of nuts, seeds and grains as “milk” has been common since at least the 15th century. The Oxford English Dictionary cites “the milk of cocoa nuts,” the milk of figs, and the “milks of wild-poppies, garden-poppies, dandelions, hawk-weed, and sow-thistle.” “Milk” need not even refer to a foodstuff. At your local pharmacy you’ll still find a suspension of magnesium hydroxide used for upset stomachs, called Phillip’s Milk of Magnesia. (And where would we be without “the milk of human kindness”?)

If we have forgotten these once-common usages, it is only because the animal industry wants us to believe that only foods derived from animals can be truly nourishing. Amid growing public awareness of the ecological and ethical problems associated with raising and killing billions of animals for food, the industry now hopes to obliterate the last cultural traces of these earlier meanings, wiping clean our collective memory. But we should be allowed to have our plant meats and milks — and eat and drink them, too.



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Food for thought
As we all know
Only eat that which
From the ground,
Grows

Karen Lyons Kalmenson




In the inferno – thoughts about selective empathy

January 13, 2020
by


Source There’s an Elephant in the Room Blog



As Australia burns, the media shows harrowing scenes of indigenous species like koalas and kangaroos, injured, burned and dying. We see so many human interest stories, individual koala mothers with infants clutching at their fur being rescued and cared for; we are invited to feel the personal tragedy of a single kangaroo joey tangled in the fence where he was incinerated.  Whether mourned or rescued, they are viewed as individuals, and we are united in hope for their survival, watching with bated breath as we are shown desperate creatures under an orange sky, fleeing through the smoke with the inferno roaring at their heels. The estimated number of 500,000,000 deaths has remained static for well over a week and has no doubt been wildly exceeded by now – possibly by several orders of magnitude – and will continue to climb.

I see occasional comments that wonder why no count is being publicised of those individuals who, as the defenceless victims of nonveganism, were always destined to be slaughtered; those innocent creatures whose lives and bodies were being ‘farmed’. Their plight is consistently downplayed and they are referred to sweepingly, only as ‘livestock‘. Live. Stock.

There are no human interest stories about them, no pitiful images of burned and desperate mothers seeking water from passers-by, no heroic bystanders pouring water on their burned fur and bleeding feet. No heartwarming tales of rescue and medical care.

We are not being shown videos of their desperate flight from the cracking, howling flames. Because they can’t flee. They are sitting targets. They are dying en masse. We see the occasional distance shot of cooked, bloated and unrecognisable bodies fallen in the paddocks where they were burned alive; the occasional image of sheep with their coats frizzled by flames. But even the ‘personal interest’ stories that I’ve seen, notably one where a heatbroken animal farmer was shooting cows individually in his fields, are focussed on his tragedy, his loss of livelihood. It was not a story about the tragedy of those unique individuals who were looking down the barrel of his gun, those sentient creatures who had faced hell and terror and were now injured and suffering unbearably.

There is no mention of the fact that the hell and terror of a slaughterhouse was the only route out of their situation in any case. The real tragedy from the perspective of their exploiter was that as damaged resources, they had no monetary value, and the fire-ravaged land may be unable to support the continuation of his profitable trade. Because before any individual can be exploited as a resource for our species, we must first disregard their every entitlement to consideration as living, feeling, autonomous beings. They become resources, livestock, property. They are then discussed in terms of property loss and damage.

The unfolding catastrophe is referred to a ‘humanitarian crisis’. This focus on the human exploiters and the disregarding of the torment of the individuals they exploit on behalf of nonvegan consumers, is a perfect illustration of the mindset with which we are all indoctrinated from childhood. Almost every single one of us will claim to care about members of other animal species to some extent or another. Few of us will openly claim that causing needless harm to the defenceless, the innocent, and the vulnerable is in any way acceptable. None of us would ever admit to being the sort of person that would do that.

And yet here we are, glancing impassively over anonymous corpse-littered farmland and feeling for those whose trade trapped them there, while pouring out concern and sympathy for the wild creatures with whose suffering we allow ourselves to empathise.

Here is our species, continuing to globally slaughter over 1.5 BILLION land based individuals per WEEK to indulge an unnecessary dietary preference, while watching the results of the planetary destruction this is causing, lay waste to a land that may never recover. Surely the irony can’t be lost on everyone?

Be vegan.




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Empathy that is real,
For ALL
One should feel.

Karen Lyons Kalmenson




DxE vs. Big Ag: Help us win the Right to Rescue in 2020

January 6, 2020
by


Source Direct Action Everywhere (DxE) Facebook



In 2019, we promised that we would spark a worldwide revolution for animal rights and we did. We executed our largest mass action yet, with over 600 people converging at a massive duck farm where we rescued 32 ducklings and continued our campaign for the #RightToRescue. Our actions inspired people around the world, leading to a coordinated, global lockdown for animal rights. From Toronto to Mexico City, Paris to Seoul, activists locked down at farms, slaughterhouses, and government buildings demanding protection for animals under the law. And in 2019, our movement won a major legislative victory for animals: the first statewide fur ban in the nation. DxE investigations showed the world the cruelty of fur farming, and our press team exposed the fur industry’s corruption when they paid people hundreds to thousands of dollars to speak in opposition of the California fur ban.

And our work is getting attention well beyond the animal rights movement. We had some of the most prominent journalists in the world — including Ezra Klein, Amy Goodman, and Glenn Greenwald — applaud our actions as heroic. DxE’s investigation at a Smithfield pig farm exposed the industry’s antibiotic-resistant diseases and was covered in-depth in The New York Times. This year, we had the first-ever victory for the legal #RightToRescue when one of DxE’s investigators facing criminal charges in Canada had the charges against her dropped and the ag industry responded in shock. Since then, we’ve gotten support for the #RightToRescue from Berkeley’s peace and justice commission and the full City Council will be voting on the resolution in December. While I am confident about these victories and what they mean for our movement, I know our work is just getting started.

In 2020, we are putting Big Ag on trial. I am facing 16 felony charges in 3 states for exposing criminal animal abuse at some of the most violent places on this planet. This year for the first time ever, DxE will have the opportunity to challenge animal abusing companies like Smithfield and Petaluma Poultry in front of a judge, jury, and the entire world. What’s our goal? To enshrine groundbreaking Right to Rescue legislation in the letter of the law. And you can help us make that dream a reality.

In the new year, I might be going to prison. I’m preparing myself for that possibility, and my only wish is to see DxE cultivate leaders who will continue mobilizing the masses to the frontlines, training dozens of people in doing more groundbreaking investigatory work, and sharing more stories in mainstream media about Open Rescue. But most importantly, I want to see DxE win against Big Ag. Our cases will be testing animal cruelty laws and forcing the industry to respond to the crimes they’ve committed against animals — and when the truth comes out in court, I believe we will win the #RightToRescue.

Sign HERE

Donate HERE





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Click HERE to search.

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or all those who dare to care:

in love
in love we stand
in love we can
be grand
in love arm to arm
in love
hand in hand
in love for the better
the

greater good
in love we have power
and in love,
we should!

and thank you!

Karen Lyons Kalmenson




Earthling Ed E-Book

December 30, 2019
by

Source Earthling Ed



FREE E-Book 30 Non-Vegan Excuses & How to Respond to Them:

Over 50,000 + downloads & 122 pages designed to equip you with the knowledge and communication tips that you need to positively and confidently advocate for veganism.

“I made this e-book with the goal of creating a resource that vegans can use to help them learn how to debunk and argue against the most common excuses that people use to try and justify not going vegan and continuing to harm animals.

Knowledge is power – and there really is not one single argument against veganism whatsoever. So once you have the knowledge, which I hope this e-book provides, the power is in your hands and nothing is stopping you from planting seeds in the minds of your family, friends and anyone else you discuss veganism with.”

This e-book is entirely free to download, however if you’d like to donate towards the time it took to create, that would be hugely appreciated.”

Donate HERE

Order Free Download HERE





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Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

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2020

2020 a clear vision
perhaps to make
the right decisions.
2020 a place to see
perhaps the goodness
in humanity
2020 a time to reflect
that the best has not
happened yet.
2020 clarity
love, peace for all
and harmony.

Karen Lyons Kalmenson




“I Feel So Badly For Those Turkeys Hauled on Freezing Nights”

December 23, 2019
by

… has so many churches and so many Christmas decorations and so many people that claim to be Christians, and yet so much unnecessary horrific animal cruelty and no complaint of it, or effort to do anything to stop it …


Source United Poultry Concerns (UPC)



The Letter to the Editor that follows this Introduction was written by Shane Zoglman and published Nov. 20, 2019, by The Dubois County Herald in Indiana, a mid-Western state with a large poultry and egg industry. In granting permission to UPC to share his letter with our readers, Shane added some information about his own evolution:



Howdy, sure, post away. For some history, back when I was a teenager, and didn’t have any good examples or guidance in the form of grownups, I worked for about 4 years on a chicken farm, that is, an egg farm, gathering eggs from the mega-sized houses, taking out the dead and crippled chickens and also taking out the old ones, loading them on semis and putting the new young birds in the cages.

Photo courtesy of Animals Angels.

I also did a few part-time jobs of working for a farm where I helped load turkeys into the semis. I have to say I didn’t think about the animals’ suffering, it just didn’t enter my mind. So I am someone who has seen both sides and has changed a lot over the years. The thing I do not understand is people that never wake up. I think a big help in my waking up to animal cruelty was stumbling onto the Shark Online YouTube channel years ago. I had been to a couple rodeos as a kid, but again, never was aware of the cruelty as I see it now after seeing their videos of rodeo cruelty.

These days I do not buy guns and ammo to kill animals with. I buy binoculars to enjoy watching them with, and instead of putting effort into killing, I put effort and money into taking in animals (who) need a home as well as trying to spread some of the message in my own way that things need to change.
Shane Zoglman

 

The following is Shane’s letter in The Dubois County Herald, Nov. 20, 2019:

Protect turkeys in trucks from frigid temps

Dubois County Herald

November 20, 2019

To the editor:

Well, it is wintertime in Dubois County again, and once again the turkey manufacturing industry has done nothing to alleviate the suffering of turkeys being trucked down the highways at night in open cages, going 60-mph with no protection from the horrific freezing cold.

The profiteers of the turkey manufacturing industry cannot be bothered to spend a few bucks to lessen the cruelty they inflict on their product. After all, a healthy profit margin is what life is all about, right?

After their freezing cold, 18-wheeled torture trip, many of the turkeys are thrown still alive into boiling hot water. Then they are sold and shipped to China, where most turkeys “manufactured” in America end up. It’s so great that China gets the food and people in Dubois County get the pollution, the stink and the humanity-degrading, low-paying jobs of inflicting cruelty on animals while a few rich people at the top get the money.

What does it say that Dubois County has so many churches and so many Christmas decorations and so many people that claim to be Christians and yet so much unnecessary horrific animal cruelty and no complaint of it, or effort to do anything to stop it?

You cannot look at humans in middle America and convince me that monsters do not exist. Happy Thanksgiving, everyone.

Shane Zoglman, Jasper




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once upon a peaceful night
a dream was finally achieved
kindness ruled where cruelty
once reigned
and in compassion all
believed.
the animals in their own way
gleefully rejoiced
at last the world
had heard their
voice.

Karen Lyons Kalmenson




Dismantle Dairy

December 16, 2019
by



Source Surge Activism , Dismantle Dairy


Surge have launched a brand new campaign Dismantle Dairy, featuring 18 months of undercover footage obtained from inside UK dairy farms. Independent investigators placed hidden cameras in dairy farms around the UK, as well as obtaining HD footage during visits. The footage revealed widespread incidences of physical and emotional abuse of mothers and calves.

Surge found repeated incidences of punching, kicking, excessive tail twisting, swearing/shouting, beating with sticks, separation of calves from their mothers, force-feeding of calves and the disposal of calves. Investigators also recorded HD footage during visits, capturing harrowing scenes such as dead cows and calves left to rot outside for days.

However, rather than draw attention to individual farms and create the impression that these are isolated cases or “bad eggs”, the campaign seeks to expose the dairy industry as a whole, revealing how even standard practices such as separation at birth and removal of calves is abuse. Violence on dairy farms is ubiquitous and occurs in all farms, including those associated with high ranking officials within the industry.


This is not about one “bad farm”, or one “bad farmer”, Dismantle Dairy is about the foundations the dairy industry is built upon. Standard, legal dairy industry practice involves (but is not limited to):

Artificially inseminating dairy cows.
Separating babies from their mothers (usually within 24 – 72 hours of birth).
Killing ‘useless’ male calves soon after they are born (this is known as the “dirty secret” within the industry).
Keeping newborn calves in solitary confinement pens.
Sending dairy cows to slaughter when they can no longer produce milk for the farmer.

Prior to the campaign release, the authorities including the RSPCA and APHA have been notified of the farms and footage where necessary.

See more in the The Independent:

Cows sexually abused, hit and punched at company owned by NFU deputy president, footage shows

This particular farm is owned by Guy Smith, Deputy President of The National Farmers’ Union, the largest organisation representing farmers in the UK. What we found on the farm was so horrific, so brutal, that The Independent couldn’t show all of it in their press video; however, it is available to watch below:








Order a FREE vegan kit: http://www.peta.org/living/food/free-vegan-starter-kit/

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Searching for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics, Personal-Care Products, Vegan Products, or more?
Click HERE to search.

Click HERE to find out How to Wear Vegan!

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

PETA: https://www.petaliterature.com/

Vegan Outreach: https://veganoutreach.org/order-form/

Get your FREE Activist Kit from PETA, including stickers, leaflets, and guide HERE

Have questions? Click HERE




Animal’s are here with us,
Not for us
So says the humane world
In resounding chorus

Karen Lyons Kalmenson




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