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Until he extends the circle of his compassion to all living things, man will not himself find peace.

Albert Schweitzer, French philosopher, physician, and musician (Nobel 1952)

Earthling Ed’s The Ostrich Effect: The truth we hide from ourselves

June 10, 2019
by



Source TEDx Talks, YouTube



Why do we hide our heads in the sand when we get confronted with a challenging reality? Ed explores what truths we hide from ourselves by drawing on his experience as a documentary maker and activist. Ed Winters or “Earthling Ed” devotes his life to be a voice for the voiceless as an animal rights activist. He went from a meat-eater to vegan, and as a social media phenomenon, regular visitor on major new channels such as BBC, he advocates for animals using discussion and debate.






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Click HERE to search.

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

PETA: https://www.petaliterature.com/

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Have questions? Click HERE
 



we try to hide,
under cover we run
we try to deny
lifetimes go by
but eyes of the
heart,
when open
can see
and know that which
is reality!!!

Karen Lyons Kalmenson

 

The Rise of Veganism: 75-Photo Essay

June 3, 2019
by

Source Veganism: A Truth Whose Time Has Come
By  


It’s 2019 … and there are signs everywhere that vegan living is infiltrating the mainstream. The expansion of the vegan philosophy and way of life is unstoppable. There are public vegan-themed signs and billboards, vegan shops all over the world, vegans from all walks of life, and some proving we can accomplish great feats like climbing the highest mountains, and breaking world-records in running marathons. There’s animal liberation protests and marches spanning both hemispheres. Vegan education booths on the street, and vegan fairs and festivals are taking place globally. Vegans, or the word vegan, is on TV everyday in the U.S.A.  Plant-based meat, cheese, and ice cream are taking off and more and more non-vegan food companies are adding a line of vegan products. All this and more is conveyed within this photo collection: The Rise of Veganism.


Bristol U.K. has 2 Chilled Vegan Vending Machines called ‘Vegan Vend’

 

Nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize, Swedish schoolgirl; Greta Thunberg 
is a climate activist. In May 2019, at the age of 16, she was featured on the 
cover of Time magazine. She adopted a vegan diet as part of her fight for 
halting climate change and inspired many, including her parents. 

 

Vegan Information Project takes to the streets of Dublin, Ireland 
with grassroots activism. Roger Yates, a long term vegan since 1979,
and a professor of sociology, is part of the group. 

 

Britain’s Fiona Oakes is a long-term vegan and holds 4 world records in 
extreme marathon running, including the World Record for running a 
marathon on every continent. She is the subject of a new documentary;
‘Running for Good’, focusing on her 155 mile run through the
Sahara Desert. Fiona runs to draw attention to the suffering of animals. 
She owns the Tower Hill Stables; a sanctuary and home to 
450 rescued animals in her care. 
 
 
VeganLand has 4 Locations in Prague, Czech Republic. 
restaurant and store with the task to increase the percentage of vegans, 
and try non-violently, lovingly and morally to expand the vegan concept. 
Veganland will always be on the side of peace and compassion.






A ‘Vegans for Peace’ Woman holds an Intersectional Message Sign at a 
Protest in Raleigh, North Carolina. 




 

The U.K.’s Official Animal Rights March, organized by Surge, 
is a well organized and growing march. In 2018, there were 28,000+ 
attendees marching in 25 cities worldwide for the end of animal oppression. 

 

 

Italian bodybuilder Massimo Brunaccioni went vegan for the animals.
 He competes in international bodybuilding tournaments. He placed 1st and 2nd
in major national tournaments. 




 

Seoul, South Korea hosting a Vegan Festival. In 2018, they had the 5th vegan festival.

 

 

Women’s History Month was celebrated in Portland with a women’s right’s march 
where vegan animal rights protesters joined in to be a voice for all females.   
Photo: Dani Rukin reporting for #JaneUnChained Network News.

 

Mark Cuban of Television’s Shark Tank invests $550,00 in vegan, ethically-sourced dog treats by Wild Earth. They’re made with koji; a clean protein source containing the 10 essential amino acids that dogs need.  Wild Earth’s CEO;
Ryan Bethencourt, brought his (vegan) dogs to the show.

 

Ethan Brown, Founder and CEO of  Vegan Meat-Substitute: ‘Beyond Meat’ rings
the opening bell at the company’s initial public offering at the Nasdaq MarketSite
in New York, on May 2, 2019…with a record-breaking day showing
that people want to invest in this change to vegan-meat.





 

Vegan Comedian; Preacher Lawson is a finalist on America’s Got Talent; The Champions.  He mentions that he’s vegan during his act, and rips off his shirt at the end, displaying his beautiful vegan body!  


 

BeFairBeVegan billboard over Times Square, New York City. The campaign
was launched by Joanna Lucas (in New York City) and has since gone live to Tasmania and Melbourne, Australia, Cleveland, Seattle, Connecticut, and St. Johns, Newfoundland.   Anyone who can raise the funds can bring a ‘BeFairBeVegan’ campaign to their area.

 

Hong Kong, CHINA: Green Common, opens a Vegan cafe within a food court.

 

Buenos Aires, Argentina – Zoo Graffiti 





Ireland – 2019 New Year’s Resolution Campaign – Signs from GoVeganWorld; 
a public vegan advertising campaign. 

 

Germany – The Vegan Rainbow Project – Mechanisms of oppression such as 
homophobia, transphobia, sexism, racism, classism, and speciesism, work in similar ways, are interconnected and therefore must be combated together. The Vegan Rainbow Project wants to draw attention to and explore these interconnections of oppression. They aim to build networks in the joint struggle for the liberation of all beings.


London’s Hilton Bankside redesigned a Vegan Suite, with pineapple leather, 
eco-cotton carpet, and a plant-based key card, vegan toiletries, a vegan 
minibar and in-room menu. Even the stationary and pens/pencils have no 
animal ingredients. And the housekeeping crew uses cleaners that
are plant-based and not tested on animals, such as ‘Method’. 


The Veganz chain was founded in 2011 in Germany by Jan Bredack. The company motto is “Wir lieben Leben” (we love life).  There’s 3 branches in Berlin and 2 more in Germany. Outside of Germany, there are branches in Prague (Czech Republic), and Vienna (Austria), with plans to expand to London and Portland.
Veganz is the first vegan supermarket chain in Europe.  

In April 2019, Vegan Activists “cause chaos” with coordinated protests across the 
country. They were trying to bring attention to the new documentary ‘Dominion’ 
that shows footage inside Australia’s abattoirs. There were large organized protests  in Sydney, Melbourne, and Queensland; blocking streets and walking into abattoirs.


Australian protesters disrupted the streets and carried signs telling the public
to watch Dominion, a film on 
the treatment of animals in Australia,
narrated by celebrities such as Joaquin Phoenix, 
Rooney Mara, Sia …
Dominion has been viewed 55,000 times in 
the 48 hours after the protests. 



Senator Corey Booker and 20/20 Presidential hopeful is enjoying a vegan
burger from Atlanta’s ‘Slutty Vegan’. 


Texan; Renee King-Sonnen, formerly had a cattle ranch, turned vegan, and founded Rowdy Girl Sanctuary where the cows are not exploited and live in sanctuary. 


Montreal, Canada – Gusta Food company makes vegan sausages, cheese, burgers,
and kebabs. They also serve brunch food, and breakfast burritos with scrambled tofu.


Berlin Germany reportedly has many vegans, and they can enjoy Kiez vegan
coffee shop with delicious vegan pastries and food. The coffee is fair-trade.


Los Angeles airport welcomed its first dedicated plant-based eatery, Real Foods Daily, a well-established small chain in L.A., is also in the American Airlines Terminal 4.


Japan, on April 21, 2019, a Vegan Gourmet Festival was celebrated in Kiba Park, 
a thriving event space in Koto City, Tokyo.


Russian March for Animal Rights in 2019.




Australian Mountaineer; Dean Maher easily climbed to the top of Nepal’s Himalayan mountain, which rises 7,126 meters high. His equipment was 100% vegan. He carried the Vegan Flag, which he proudly waved when he reached the peak of the Himlung Himal mountain in the Himalaya range. 


Jewish and Arab Animal Rights Protesters join; holding up signs in Hebrew & Arab.


Emirates Airlines serves over 20,000 vegan meals in January 2019.



New Zealand is home of the lovely Vegan-Organic Garden in Palmerston North, 
grown by Fiona Harman. 


Tel Aviv, Israel – A large billboard calling for compassion for cows and calves
exploited in the dairy industry. 

The U.K.’s Vegan Organic Network (VON) at Brighton Vegfest 




American Award-Winning Actor, and activist, and 40 year vegan; Joaquin Phoenix is giving water to animals about to be slaughtered, at a vigil in California. 



London’s Unity Diner Wall Mural. ~ Unity Diner is 100% Vegan and located in the
thriving region of Hoxton, London. It’s Non-Profit; all 
proceeds fund the Animal Rights Organization SURGE. It is co-founded by popular activist Ed Winters,
known as ‘Earthling Ed’, who helps organize the official animal rights march,
where he speaks. He also speaks on TV, and recently did a TEDx Talk. 



Glasgow, Scotland – Michelle; owner of PICNIC Vegan Restaurant and Deli



On March 1, 2018, a group of adventurers climbed Mount Kilimanjaro 
on the first all-vegan expedition to Africa’s highest peak; some say the tallest 
free-standing mountain in the world. Of the team, 14 made it to the summit.
The first group 
unfurled the Vegan Kilimanjaro banner promoting
Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine’s Medical Center, 
the world’s
first plant-based medical facility. 




New Delhi India – March 2019 – Animal Rights Activists Stage Peaceful Demonstration ‘Call For Justice’ As Part of Vegan India Movement



Ft. Lauderdale, Florida – Vegan Fine Foods store and restaurant is 100%
vegan, including no sugar from bone char, strictly vegan. 




Budapest, Hungary’s Vegan Street Food Caravan



 Los Angeles hosts and boasts the largest vegan festival: ‘Vegan Street Fair’



Hong Kong – One Vegan Shop is stocked with 100% dairy-free vegan cheese Sheese,  Organic nut spreads, even cruelty-free Benevo pet food. 



Athens, Greece – 2019 Protest for Animals (lamb slaughter)



U.K. Animal Rights March organized by SURGE, grows and inspires other marches.



Jews and Arabs march together for Animal Rights



Buenos Aires, Argentina “Animal Rights Street-Art” displaying sorrow 
about Argentina’s mass production of “beef”.



Melbourne, Australia’s Vegan Vending Machine



Miley Cyrus and Liam Hemsworth had a Vegan Wedding Reception. 
Feb. 2019 Miley released photos on Instragram. Her friend/caterer released the vegan menu. 



Mexico City is home to Vegan Inc.



Edmonton, Canada – March to End Speciesism 

World Day for the end of Speciesism (WoDES) invites animal-rights groups around the globe  to organize events highlighting speciesist discrimination and demanding that the interests of animals be fully protected. 



Prague, Czech Republic Vegan Healthy Store



Havana Cuba – April 2019 – Activists march against cruelty to animals, in what is 
thought to be the first independent protest allowed in the country.



Ireland’s largest and longest-running  Vegan Advertising Campaign: Go Vegan World


Amsterdam’s Vegan Junk Food Bar (restaurant) has 4 locations.

Madrid, Spain Animal Rights Activists getting the public’s attention; in Puerta del Sol.


Budapest, Hungary is home to the ‘Vegan-Love’ Vegan Street Food Eatery


Cape Town, Africa Animal Rights Protest



Brussels, Belgium’s Vegan Street Fair



Allentown, PA. – The owners of the ‘Vegan Butcher Shop’ that just opened in 2019 





Wellington, New Zealand is where this Billboard was spotted. 



Ho-Chi-Min City, Vietnam hosts the Halo Vegan Cafe (Be-Vegan-Make-Peace)



Moscow, Russian Vegan Cafe


France protest – Justice pour del animoux (Justice for the animals)


Ireland’s ‘GoVeganWorld’ Campaign Bus Ad


Berkeley, California – May, 2019 – Activists protesting a popular “butcher” shop in Berkeley.


Veganz Vegan Ice Cream Stand



Ireland bus ad



Coconut Grove, Miami, has the world’s first unified plant-based enterprises called The vShops; bringing the finest tasting, ethically-sourced vegan foods, drinks, desserts and sundries.  This pioneering and trend-setting 2019 manifestation consists of an Ice Dream Parlor, Choices Cafe, a vegan pizzeria, a smoothie place, a bakery, etc.

Paris, France March to Close All Abattoirs (slaughterhouses). 



Melbourne, Australia – Animal Rights Activism


Manhattan, New York’s ‘Moo Shoes’ – An all vegan shoe
and accessory shop for both women and men. 



Toronto, Canada – March to Close All Slaughterhouses, Justice for Animals.  
 

Austin, Texas – 2019 Rabbit Food Grocery all-vegan store moves/expands. 

April 2019 – Thousands of protesters march for animal rights in Hong Kong. Organizers were surprised by the number of people who showed up for the rally that ended outside government headquarters.







Order a FREE vegan kit: http://www.peta.org/living/food/free-vegan-starter-kit/

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Searching for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics, Personal-Care Products, Vegan Products, or more?
Click HERE to search.

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

PETA: https://www.petaliterature.com/

Vegan Outreach: https://veganoutreach.org/order-form/

Have questions? Click HERE

 



when we rise to a place
of harmony,
then our true world self
can really be.

Karen Lyons Kalmenson

 


From Shepherd to Advocate: Why I Focus on Animal Suffering

May 28, 2019
by
sheep-in-lappeenranta-2014fall-1024x834

Source Mikko Jarvenpaa / Sentient Media. Author (on the left) with a friend.

 

Source Sentient Media
By Mikko Jarvenpaa, Founder



In a world rife with human suffering and problems, why should one focus on animal rights and animal suffering? My answer is at once moral, emotional, and rational.

In retrospect my personal path to animal rights has been both obvious and meandering. It consists of both emotionally charged experiences and cool-headed rational thought.

But it has been far from obvious to many of my friends why I would make the change from tech entrepreneurship into something that has a more positive impact on the world, and end up dedicating my efforts to animal rights. For their and my benefit, I wanted to chart my course briefly, lest my friends explain this all away with my never-too-latent rebellious tendencies, or by just having stayed in Northern California for too long.

Friends with sheep

I was born and grew up in Eastern Finland. As long as I can remember, my father had the hobby of keeping sheep. I call it a hobby because it wasn’t for economic gain but for reasons of self-reliance with meat – and wool, which my mother used as materials for her art. For me, the sheep were at least as good as pets, nearly friends.

Sheep are actually pretty amazing. The common misconception is that sheep are stupid, easily freaked out, and just, in general, pretty sheepish animals. But that’s before you get to know them. Yes, they certainly have strong herd instincts and can all bolt pretty easily if even one sheep feels threatened. But once you get to know them and they accept you into their herd, you learn their individual characteristics. Some are more playful than others. Some are entirely food-motivated while some will just want to get scratches. Some are devious and try to come up with different ways of escaping. They often collaborate, for example, by leaning against bushes to push them lower for others to eat.

I didn’t have too many human friends growing up. There were no kids within walking distance until I was seven or so. So the sheep were doubly important to me. We’d sometimes keep them over the winter, and my brother and I would often be responsible for bringing them fresh water and feed in their winter shelter. I took part in all parts of their lives, except the very last.

In the fall, the men would come. I don’t remember what they looked like, but I remember what I felt like. My dad told me not to come over to the sheep enclosure that day. I stayed indoors and played the radio loud to drown any sounds. Whether there were sounds from the slaughter, I don’t know.

After the men left, I would sometimes sneak into the small garage in the enclosure where the slaughter had taken place. The floor was always stained with blood and I seem to remember seeing the implements of violence, though I don’t remember exactly what they were.

What I do remember, though, is the tremendous sense of loss. Loss of lives that didn’t want to die. Loss of beings that were close to me and that I was close to. And most harrowingly, the palpably present sense of loss by the animals still left behind to kept over the winter. They had lost their young, their parents, their friends, the only other beings that could give them a sense of safety. The sheep I remember well, huddled together at a safe distance, all tense, staring at me, the person who used to be there for them.

Betraying the trust of the innocent is the worst feeling I know.

Thinking rationally about animal suffering

Since the age of 15, I was vegetarian, on and off, for a long time. Even in my off-times, I never felt right about eating mammals: cows, pigs, and sheep always felt too close to human, too close to eat. For a long time, I tried to consider birds and fish more biological robots than sentient beings (and I was badly wrong in this). It took nearly 20 years from first going vegetarian for me to piece the puzzle together and take action that was consistent with my ethics.

The key to taking that action is suffering – realizing that it is suffering that I most oppose, not the loss of life, or the act of killing, or even the system of speciesist exploitation.

I had to go deep for this realization. I went back to school at the ripe age of 30 and completed my Master’s in Philosophy of Social Sciences at the London School of Economics and Political Science. I focused on the philosophy of biological and cognitive sciences with an interest in ethics and the evolution of morality.

To summarize in three very broad strokes: first, understanding the suffering of others makes evolutionary sense for any animals that live in groups and have the capacity to do so (assume this holds at least for all vertebrates: mammals, birds, and fish, to mention the most exploited classes of the animal kingdom). The subjective experience of suffering is more obvious, but that also makes a lot of evolutionary sense: pain is a harm-reduction mechanism. Practically all animals with a spine feel and “understand” each others’ pain (quotes only to emphasize that their understanding may be very different from our verbal understanding). Considering a non-human animal’s mental suffering is just as valid as considering the mental suffering of a human animal.

Second, reduction and elimination of involuntary suffering is perhaps the most universally appealing goal across most ethical frameworks. Some moral codes allow for causing harm or having a neutral stance on it, but in my view none of them are intuitively or rationally appealing. Everybody wants good things, and involuntary suffering is not a good thing.

And third, to have an impact one needs to focus on things that are most neglected. This idea stems from utilitarianism, though I’m not a total utilitarian in my views. This is also what lead me to put theory into practice.

Based on these premises, though considered in much more detail, I realized there is an urgent need to focus on the suffering of animals. We keep producing more animals into lives systematically filled with physical and mental suffering. In factory farming for meat, eggs, and dairy, we do this to billions of beings and we cause them to suffer. We do this needlessly, and we do it willfully. Importantly, we do it as a part of a self-enforcing system of economic and cultural structures.

Ok, you may say, animals suffer, but why would someone concerned with suffering focus on animals in a world with so much human suffering to go around? Surely human suffering ought to be addressed before taking up the fight against animal suffering?

Personally, I subscribe to the view that human life and human experience is indeed more valuable and more desirable than a non-human animal experience of life – but not incomparably so, and certainly not indefinitely so. This doesn’t mean there has to be a certain number of animals that are morally equivalent to a human. I believe comparisons can be made even though they be theoretical and uncomfortable, while at the same time I do not desire there to be a moral calculus that would tell us how many B-lives are worth one A-life.

For example, if I was forced to cause a proportionally similar amount of suffering to a chicken or to a pig, say, suffering equivalent to that of a lost limb, I would choose to cause the suffering to the chicken because I assume that action to cause less suffering both in quantity and – perhaps more controversially – in quality. This disagreeable example (and there are much worse thought experiments used by experimental philosophers) may seem intuitively sensible, but in addition to pure intuition we may also attempt to approximate the probability of the volume of suffering experienced by things like the complexity of the animal’s neural and cognitive systems. Yet even this is done not ever knowing the subjective experience of suffering of another being. And, yes, I may well be wrong with this example and future evidence shows that avian suffering is actually more intense and severe than the suffering of large mammals, in which case I ought to adjust my response to this thought experiment accordingly.

Extending comparisons from animal suffering to human suffering seems like a very bad idea. Almost taboo. Surely some things are black and white – animals are animals and humans are humans? The same person who finds that intuition to be common sense may also be a dog owner who loves their canine companion dearly. That person may well value the life of their pet much higher than that of a human stranger on the other side of the world. In doing so, they are actively making cross-species ethical comparisons that they intuitively agree with. But we are experts at living with moral inconsistency. We are forced to be such experts because human intelligence is limited.

Without going into detail of how comparisons should or even could be made, let’s just assume that sentient suffering is somehow comparable, contrastable, even if human suffering should be orders of magnitude more important than the suffering of the next most intelligent exploited animal. Which is the pig, rather uncontroversially. Yes: bacon, ham, pork chops – all made of intelligent, socially complex, family-centered animals who suffer insanely in the process. Hundreds of millions of such sentient beings every year.

The sinews of suffering

Before taking a closer look at animals, consider just a sampling of the dizzying extent of human suffering in the world today.

There are 70 million forcibly displaced people in the world according to the UNHCR due to wars, persecution, and other upheavals. In 2015, 736 million people lived in extreme poverty (under $1.90 per day), and 3.4 billion people still struggle to meet basic needs, living on less than $3.20 per day in lower-middle-income countries or under $5.50 in upper-middle-income countries according to the World Bank. In the US, more than 10 million women and men are subjects of domestic violence every year. The WHO estimates that over 200 million women have been subjected to female genital mutilation. And I could continue this list for hours.

It’s not that I don’t care about human suffering. The degrees and types of cruelty, neglect, inequality, terror, and other sources of human suffering are mind-boggling and too frequently horrifying.

So the question remains, now stronger than ever – why animal rights? My answer is the proportional neglectedness of farmed animals: no matter how you look at things, animal suffering is incredibly neglected.

Let’s take a couple of proxies to quantify neglectedness. In 2017, Americans gave $410 billion dollars to charitable causes. For 2015, Animal Charity Evaluators estimated the top 10 farmed animal outreach organizations to have budgets of $20 million. Let’s assume they count for 50% of the total budgets, and call it $40 million in total to get a conservative overestimate. Note that this would also include governmental grants which are not included in the $410 billion giving figure. Yet to remain conservative, other causes (which are primarily human causes) get approximately 10,250 times the donations that farmed animals do in the US.

There are over 9 billion farmed land animals killed every year in the US (and probably tens of billion of fish). Without exaggeration, 99% of these farmed land animals are born into the factory farming system where suffering is the norm, not the exception, and where cruelty is sanctioned.

Therefore, if we accept that animals can suffer (they can), that we are causing their suffering (we are), and that we should focus our efforts on targets that need the most help (and as I’ve argued, yes, we should), then focusing on animal rights is rational. Even if you wanted to claim that human experience of suffering is 100,000 times more valuable than an animal experience of suffering for purposes of allocating resources, you’d still be left with the equivalent of 90,000 violent human deaths that capped lives of near-constant suffering. As violent and unequal as the US is, there are less than 20,000 violent human deaths per year with billions of dollars in private and public funding aimed at addressing those deaths, as opposed to the $40 million for the suffering of farmed animals.

And very importantly, there are many powerful people and well-funded organizations seeking to eradicate diseases, to alleviate poverty, and to put an end to cruel traditions where humans suffer. Animals have very few such friends, especially in proportion to the problem. While human suffering is very real and horrible, human suffering is not nearly as neglected as animal suffering.

For another angle of how neglected animal suffering is, consider how often you see animal rights discussed in the media. We should be surprised that the constant suffering of billions of our fellow Earth-dwellers in the hands of our fellow humans is not perpetually in the news. But still today the opposite holds: people are surprised and even dismayed that they are asked to question their beliefs and behavior when it comes to their lunch. The rare occasions that animal suffering is discussed in media, it is mostly on topics of outright animal abuse and neglect (usually of dogs, cats, or horses), or the use of animals in entertainment or laboratory testing. As horrible as those cases are, they pale in volume to the suffering on factory farms: in the US, there are 500 animals used and killed on factory farms for every one animal used in a laboratory.

No matter how you dice things, it is especially farmed animals who are neglected and whose suffering challenges us with its moral urgency.

The power in animals

My reasons for focusing on animal rights are both emotional and rational. There is much more to my personal experience and rationale than what I presented here. And I didn’t even get to mention the climate impact of animal agriculture (at least as big as that of all global transport), human health (from carcinogenic meat to health risks of dairy), or existential threats of animal agriculture (a promising breeding ground for antibiotic-resistant pathogens).

But there is one more thing to mention when focusing on animal rights: tractability.

I believe we can make a major positive difference for farmed animals within my lifetime. We may not eliminate animal farming within decades, but it will become undesirable, unprofitable, and widely morally questionable. Within one generation, eating animals and animal products like dairy and eggs will be viewed like smoking is generally viewed in the US today – pretty disgusting but somewhat tolerable. Within two generations, the same practices will be viewed like public executions are viewed today – morally reprehensible, barbaric, still done in some places in the world, but something that ought to be confined into the annals of history.

The issue is tractable because people care. Animals are powerful allies. They are relatable, cute, friendly, and wholesome. They are our link to nature and natural things. They give us support and happiness while our social ties erode and become fewer.

The vast majority of meat eaters care about animals. Many are even a little annoyed by suggestions that they are doing something wrong, because they know they well might be. I know I was.

And back in Finland, on some years there are still sheep at the house I grew up in. If I go, I still meet them and watch them play, graze, and socialize. But I don’t stay for the fall.

Please reach out to me on Twitter with any comments or questions.







Order a FREE vegan kit: http://www.peta.org/living/food/free-vegan-starter-kit/

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Searching for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics, Personal-Care Products, Vegan Products, or more?
Click HERE to search.

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

PETA: https://www.petaliterature.com/

Vegan Outreach: https://veganoutreach.org/order-form/

Have questions? Click HERE





Our animal brothers are not menu choices
We the compassionate will be their voices

Karen Lyons Kalmenson

 



Vegan Calculator

May 20, 2019
by

 

personal
Source Carnism Debunked


Please click HERE for a vegan calculator
Source Vegan Calculator



Use this calculator to see the impact you have made being vegan. A vegan lifestyle requires less resources like water, food, and oil; it contributes less CO2 to the atmosphere; and animals are not killed for your consumption.

Raising livestock contributes more to global warming than automobiles, and it is the second-leading cause of global warming behind industrial pollution.

Choosing to become vegan is one of the best things you can do for the environment.

Choosing to become vegan is the best thing you can do for animals.




Order a FREE vegan kit: http://www.peta.org/living/food/free-vegan-starter-kit/

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Searching for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics, Personal-Care Products, Vegan Products, or more?
Click HERE to search.

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

PETA: https://www.petaliterature.com/

Vegan Outreach: https://veganoutreach.org/order-form/

Have questions? Click HERE



❤ the sum of kindness is even greater than our hearts ❤

Karen Lyons Kalmenson




‘Family Dairy Farms’ Destroy Families: My Dairy Tour

May 13, 2019
by

Not graphic, one minute, please watch.

Source Free From Harm
By Calen Otto



The town of Asheville, North Carolina, has been called the “Progressive Mecca of the South”. And while it is home to a lot of liberal-minded people and activists, there’s one form of oppression that many of the most left-leaning advocates still happily support and celebrate, and that is animal exploitation and slaughter.

Sure, Asheville has a large vegan community and lots of vegan-friendly restaurants, but, as Free from Harm has previously written, it is also a hotbed for the humane animal farming myth. The town’s cafés, restaurants and farmer’s markets regularly boast of their “ethical meat” and milk and cheese from “happy cows” on “family farms.”

I recently had occasion to visit one such celebrated “family dairy farm,” Maple View Farm, just outside of Chapel Hill, NC. Maple View supplies many local businesses in the Triangle area, and it also supplies the Asheville milk delivery company, Farm to Home. The Farm to Home “milk man” describes his job of delivering this milk as doing something “ethically” and with “integrity.”

As I walked through this esteemed family dairy that is favorably known in the community, I was astonished by what I saw and heard. In the dairy industry, female cows must be lactating to produce milk. That means that they are forcefully impregnated over and over through artificial insemination, without their consent, so they will give birth and begin lactating at optimal yields. Their bodies are pushed through this stressful and wearing cycle every year so that they will produce as much breast milk as possible. I learned that on this farm, mother cows are slaughtered after several years once their milk production declines. This is true of most cows in the dairy industry, who are killed at only a fraction of their natural lifespan when their output slows down and they become less profitable.

In addition to this tragedy, once cows used for dairy give birth, their babies are taken away from them. The farmer himself told me that the babies on his farm do not once drink the milk straight from their mothers’ udders, and never will. Instead, they receive their first life-giving fluids from a human hand and plastic bottle.

Please read rest HERE







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Have questions? Click HERE

 



a truth denied
is a truth that remains.
no amount of denial
can end the suffering
and pain!

Karen Lyons Kalmenson

 


Ninth Circuit Affirms Dismissal of Almond Milk Labeling Lawsuit

May 6, 2019
by

Hamburgers don’t have ham. Hot dogs don’t have dog. But calling it a ‘veggie burger’ is misleading?

Paul Shapiro, Twitter

 

Source Animal Legal Defense Fund
Written by Nicole Pallotta, Academic Outreach Manager



In an unpublished opinion issued December 20, 2018, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the of a against Blue Diamond Growers.

The lawsuit alleged that the company’s almond milk products were mislabeled under Food and Drug Administration (FDA) law, and use of the term “almond milk” misled consumers into thinking the products were nutritionally equivalent to dairy milk. The claimed that almond milk should be labeled “imitation milk” to prevent consumers from being confused about the differences between almond milk and dairy milk.

The appellate court affirmed the district court’s dismissal on preemption grounds. The court found that “almond milk is not a ‘substitute’ for dairy milk . . . because almond milk does not involve literally substituting inferior ingredients for those in dairy milk.”

Thus, the federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FDCA) does not require almond milk to stop using the term “milk,” include a nutritional comparison of almond milk to dairy milk, or use the words “imitation milk.” The ‘s claims, which sought to impose these additional requirements, were “not identical to” federal law and were thus preempted.

The appellate court also agreed with the lower court that no reasonable consumer would “assume that two distinct products have the same nutritional content” and affirmed the dismissal of the plaintiff’s claims under California’s consumer protection laws.

Further Reading:






Order a FREE vegan kit: http://www.peta.org/living/food/free-vegan-starter-kit/

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Searching for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics, Personal-Care Products, Vegan Products, or more?
Click HERE to search.

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend.
PETA: http://www.petacatalog.com/catalog/Literature-39-1.html

Vegan Outreach: https://veganoutreach.org/order-form/

Have questions? Click HERE





 

The dairy industry cowers,
As it reaches its final hours!

Karen Lyons Kalmenson

 

 



Death Row

April 29, 2019
by



Source YouTube , Kinder World



Please note that this video is not “visually” graphic; it depicts the moments before a cow is killed. He waits for his death in fear, sadness, and terror, not knowing or understanding what he did to deserve such a painful existence and indifferent death. I wonder that, too.






Order a FREE vegan kit: http://www.peta.org/living/food/free-vegan-starter-kit/

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Searching for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics, Personal-Care Products, Vegan Products, or more?
Click HERE to search.
Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend.
PETA: http://www.petacatalog.com/catalog/Literature-39-1.html

Vegan Outreach: https://veganoutreach.org/order-form/

Have questions? Click HERE



 

Please we do not want to die
We want a chance at life’s great
Dance,
Please see the terror in our eyes
It would be yours too if
You were I.
A heart is all it really takes
Cruelties cause the worst
Mistakes

Karen Lyons Kalmenson




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