Skip to content

Unity ...

Until he extends the circle of his compassion to all living things, man will not himself find peace.

Albert Schweitzer, French philosopher, physician, and musician (Nobel 1952)

Report Illegal and Dangerous Conduct: ReportAnimalAg.com

September 21, 2020
by
In Greeley, Colorado, near the JBS beef slaughterhouse: twelve employees have died from COVID-19.

Source ReportAnimalAg.com

The Animal Legal Defense Fund is offering ReportAnimalAg.com as an online tip portal for industrial animal agriculture workers to anonymously report activities of concern. 

You can report any work-related concern.

Facts:

37,558 US workers have tested positive for COVID-19.

In Waterloo, Iowa, the Tyson Foods pork plant – where over 1,000 employees tested positive for COVID-19.

In Tama, Iowa, the National Beef Packing beef plant – where 361 out of 500 employees tested positive for COVID-19.

In Perry, Iowa, the Tyson Fresh Meats pork processing plant – where 58% of employees tested positive for COVID-19.

Please visit ReportAnimalAg.com

You can file a report identifying yourself or you can file a report anonymously to protect your identity.



Download Your FREE Vegan PDF HERE

Order a FREE vegan kit HERE

Download Your FREE Dairy-Free PDF HERE

Take the Dairy-Free Challenge HERE

Click HERE for more Dairy-Free

Fish alternatives can be found HERE

Learn about eggs HERE

Find bacon alternatives HERE

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Searching for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics, Personal-Care Products, Vegan Products, or more?
Click HERE to search.

Click HERE to find out How to Wear Vegan!

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

PETA HERE

Vegan Outreach HERE

Get your FREE Activist Kit from PETA, including stickers, leaflets, and guide HERE

Have questions? Click HERE

“What Is It Like to Be a Bat?”

September 14, 2020
by
sowjo-annemcarthur

A sow looks through the bars of her gestation crate. Source Jo-Anne McArthur / Essere Animali, We Animals Media

Source PsychCentral
By Shiri Raz, PhD

Originally published May 2020

This post is by contributing writer Shiri Raz, PhD candidate in the psychoanalysis and hermeneutics program at Bar-Ilan University, Israel.

In his well-known article “What Is It Like to Be A Bat?” from 1974, philosopher Thomas Nigel argues that though anyone can imagine how a bat feels, they can never truly experience the world from a bat’s point of view. In his opinion, human experience is limited in its senses and its structure of consciousness to understanding itself and that alone.

Many disagree, including Nobel Laureate J. M. Coetzee. In The Lives of Animals, Coetzee’s protagonist Elizabeth Costello argues that in the same manner, one can empathize with fictional literary heroes, one can just as readily identify with animals. The prerequisite for this understanding is the recognition that we are all mortals, sharing life and death on Earth: “If I can think my way into the existence of a being who has never existed, I can think my way into the existence of a bat or a chimpanzee or an oyster, any being with whom I share the substrate of life.”

These days, the complex philosophical discussion of our ability to share the experience of animals in our world is no longer merely theoretical. Now the tables are turned, and we can now see, hear, and breathe the world as the environment and animals do under man’s tyrannical, violent rule.

As our lungs struggle with the risk of fatal pollution, the Earth’s lungs are recovering. The skies are clear of planes, roads are empty, unimpeded, forests grow, and global air pollution is on a dramatic decline.

As we are isolated, imprisoned in our homes, many animals have been recently spotted in places where they have not set paw for centuries: monkeys are visiting certain areas of Thailand; deer visiting Japan’s desolate cities.

And, as we keep an anxious eye trained on the numbers, with their exponential increase in fatalities and infections, the marine biosphere, for which researchers have predicted death within three decades, has begun to glimmer with initial signs of recovery.

All of these are reminiscent of the ironic caricature featuring a doctor that examines a dying Earth, who gravely announces, “I’m sorry, I’m afraid what you have is humans.” We cannot but stop to consider which of the two global viruses is more dangerous – corona or humanity.

We are now forced to cope with our allegedly limited imagination when trying to conceptualize what it feels like to be a bat in a human-dominated world. Or a calf, or a chicken. Afraid, helpless and hopeless, victims of some other being that uses our bodies for its selfish use.

The desolate streets, the grounded planes, the locked amusement parks, hotels that became quarantines from which not everyone would eventually check out. All these and other images are reminiscent of futuristic dystopias and films of the apocalypse, but in reality, Bruce Willis, Ben Affleck, Linda Hamilton, or even Dustin Hoffman are nowhere to be found.

We have lost control of our health, our livelihoods and our most fundamental liberties as human beings in the free world, seemingly unable to do anything. We believe that our responsibility in preventing this pandemic – and the more sophisticated ones to ensue – amounts to basic personal hygiene and maintaining social distance. But our true responsibility goes far beyond remembering to sneeze into our elbows. Ours is the momentous responsibility to stop the maintenance and existence of those toxic, disease-riddled habitats and the source of the next (and worse!) pandemic that are chicken coops and henhouses, meat and dairy farms – all crowded with sick animals pumped full of antibiotics to keep them alive.

Only humans can create such an ironic reality in which the pandemic has shut down thousands of businesses, the economy is crippled by hundreds of thousands of unemployed, kindergartens and schools have closed – but slaughterhouses continue to operate. People stockpile their freezers with meat and fill the fridge with dairy products and eggs – all coming from the source of the next patient-zero — and fail to make the connection.

We are so busy blaming the victim, with the futile obsession with whether the virus came from a miserable bat or suffering pangolin, while deliberately avoiding the realization that all animal food industries are a ticking time bomb, a petri dish for deadly and dangerous viruses that will soon inherit the corona crown – and outdo its havoc.

We are indifferent to the possibility of saving ourselves from future pandemics. Those of us already aware of the connection between outbreaks and the animal food industry are finding it increasingly difficult to keep our anger and despair in check. It’s hard not to acknowledge the sadness behind one of the most widespread sentiments among vegan groups during this era, as we all-too-painfully know it is true: “We wouldn’t be in this mess if the world were vegan.”

We have long passed the “carrot” phase of learning about the benefits of a plant-based diet. We are currently licking the first wounds from the blows of the “stick,” many of which are yet to come, as humanity continues in its systematically violent industrialized exploitation of animals and the environment.

We will probably never know what it feels like to be a bat, but it isn’t because of any limitations on human thought or sensory capability. Rather it is because of our mere reluctance to do so. We don’t want to imagine the terror experienced by a newborn calf after being torn from his mother at birth, or the horror of a cramped truck on his journey to slaughter. We have no interest in imagining what it feels like to spend two years in a cage no bigger than your body, and your legs supported only by a mesh chain floor as you lay eggs without the ability to spread your wings or turn around. Nor are we particularly inclined to take the time and imagine how a young bat feels when snatched from his family, forcefully bound and then thrown alive into a pot of boiling water. We balk at imagining these experiences: and now we are paying a very high price for the fact they exist.

At this time of crisis, we all find ourselves forced to face an essential lesson in the actuality of suffering. The lesson – should we allow ourselves to learn it – will be the discovery of our empathy, modesty and responsibility for this planet as humans. These rediscovered abilities will enable us to hope for a better future and to give our children a world in which we all – humans and animals alike – will be able to live and breathe freely.

It would be a simpler life, more interdependent with nature, less selfish, less hedonistic perhaps – but life. As the bat promises, in the final words of “The Dark Knight”: “It will be a good life. Good enough.”

This post is by contributing writer Shiri Raz.

Shiri Raz – PhD candidate; psychoanalysis and hermeneutics program at Bar-Ilan University, Israel. Shiri focuses her research on the psychoanalytic and linguistic aspects of people’s mental attitudes toward the consumption and use of animal-based products. Shiri serves as a therapist for couples and individuals, specializing in work with vegans and mixed couples (vegans and non-vegans) in Israel and worldwide (through video chats). She is an animal rights activist, academic lecturer, resident lecturer for the Vegan Friendly association’s educational program and for the Animals Now (non-profit) organization, and a public speaker.

 

 




Download Your FREE Vegan PDF HERE

Order a FREE vegan kit HERE

Download Your FREE Dairy-Free PDF HERE

Take the Dairy-Free Challenge HERE

Click HERE for more Dairy-Free

Fish alternatives can be found HERE

Learn about eggs HERE

Find bacon alternatives HERE

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Searching for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics, Personal-Care Products, Vegan Products, or more?
Click HERE to search.

Click HERE to find out How to Wear Vegan!

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

PETA HERE

Vegan Outreach HERE

Get your FREE Activist Kit from PETA, including stickers, leaflets, and guide HERE

Have questions? Click HERE



we are one of many species. once we embrace our oneness with all our animal brothers, our earth and our hearts, will heal. as we share the joy of this unity. empathy empowers us to be what we could and should be.

compassion is the forever fashion

Karen Lyons Kalmenson

Dear Dying Dairy Industry: It’s Too Little, Too Late

September 5, 2020
by
A Mother Dairy Cow Crying for Her Stolen Calf


Please note that in the United States alone 587,000 calves were killed in 2019 so their mother’s milk, naturally and biologically intended for them, could instead be sold to a different, aging species, with teeth.

Source USDA



Source Free From Harm

By Calen Otton

A new video has appeared on the internet that was created by the Got Milk? campaign and Katie Ledecky, apparently targeting a younger generation. Localsyr.com says, “The ‘Got Milk?’ advertising campaign is back, but it’s targeting a new audience. The ads are working to target the YouTube-TikTok generation with videos like the one above. The video shows Olympic swimmer Katie Ledecky swim the entire length of a pool while balancing a glass of chocolate milk on her head!”

As a member of the “Youtube-TikTok” generation, I have one message for the dairy industry: It’s too little, too late.

In 2018, the FDA reported that the dairy industry plummeted 1.1 billion dollars. Then in 2019 alone, oat milk sales in the U.S. grew by 686%. Businesswire.com reports that “The plant-based milk market is expected to reach US $21.52 billion in 2024, growing at a CAGR of 10.18%, for the duration spanning 2020-2024.”

So, I understand why the dairy industry is shuffling to try and rope in younger generations of changemakers. But, someone balancing a glass of a cow’s breast milk on their head, while swimming laps, won’t convince us that consuming the stolen breast milk of another species is healthy, happy, athletic, and wholesome. It’s pretty obvious that humans were not meant to continue breastfeeding, especially off of other animals, into adulthood. It’s been proven time and time again that we don’t need to drink animal milk to be healthy; just check out all of the plant-based athletes sharing their stories with Switch4Good.

As a young adult pushing our society forward, and trying my best to push it in the right direction, I take the time to do my research and see with my own eyes where my “food” comes from. The facts about dairy are plain and simple, and there are so many incredible plant-based dairy products these days. The bottom line is that the dairy industry forcibly impregnates females, kidnaps their babies, disregards male calves as trash, sentences females to a lifetime of misery, and slaughters the mothers when they no longer produce milk. That violation of the female reproductive system and violence is something that I refuse to support, even if someone can swim a whole lap with a glass of milk balanced on their head.

Respond to Katie Ledecky’s Twitter and Instagram video by leaving a comment to let her know why you won’t support the dairy industry!



Download Your FREE Vegan PDF HERE

Order a FREE vegan kit HERE

Download Your FREE Dairy-Free PDF HERE

Take the Dairy-Free Challenge HERE

Click HERE for more Dairy-Free

Fish alternatives can be found HERE

Learn about eggs HERE

Find bacon alternatives HERE

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Searching for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics, Personal-Care Products, Vegan Products, or more?
Click HERE to search.

Click HERE to find out How to Wear Vegan!

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

PETA HERE

Vegan Outreach HERE

Get your FREE Activist Kit from PETA, including stickers, leaflets, and guide HERE

Have questions? Click HERE


We are friends not food
We are not drinks
We are living beings
Who feel and think

Karen Lyons Kalmenson


The International Vegan Film Festival Goes Virtual

August 29, 2020
by

Source IVFF

Ottawa, Canada — The International Vegan Film Festival will be doing something entirely new for its third annual event. It’s going virtual.

The 2020 Festival will take place online with digital screenings, panels, filmmaker Q&As and more from October 10th – 17th. The event will take place on the Eventive platform with the full schedule of event and ticket information being released in mid-September on the Festival website.

Founded in 2018, The International Vegan Film Festival is the world’s premier vegan film festival, dedicated to celebrating the vegan ideal: a healthier, compassionate, environmentally-friendly lifestyle that can be achieved through the consumption of plants and animal-free alternatives.

“Like many other live events around the world, we’ve had to adapt to prioritize the safety, comfort and well-being of our community,” said Festival Executive Director, Shawn Stratton.

The full list of films playing in the festival will be available in late September. Below are a few of the films that will be included:  

Regan Russell – A Short Documentary

On the morning of June 19, 2020, Regan Russell was outside Fearmans slaughterhouse in Burlington, Ontario for a special vigil to give water to thirsty, dehydrated pigs when a pig transport truck drove right into her and dragged her body for more than 15 meters. This documentary showcases Regan’s young life, her involvement in animal rights, her last day of activism, and the aftermath of her death.

Butenland

The story of a former dairy farmer, an animal rights activist and the first cow retirement home.

A farm that has become a farm for life – the former dairy farmer Jan Gerdes and the animal welfare activist Karin Mück have created a place with their project Hof Butenland where there are no more livestock: a peaceful coexistence that seems almost utopian.

INVISIBLE

INVISIBLE is a short film exploring a dangerous and secret world that has never before been documented. Following undercover investigators ‘Sarah’ and ‘Emily’ (their names have been changed to protect their identities) on an investigation at a pig farm in Europe, INVISIBLE grants the viewer unprecedented access to a world that is deliberately and painstakingly covert.

Stratton said that “this year has given us an opportunity to think creatively about how we can make the festival more accessible and innovative than ever before, and we are excited to deliver a memorable experience that honors all the reasons we’ve become known as the premier event for vegan-themed content creators and film enthusiasts.”

This year’s fest still promises to highlight more short and feature-length films than ever. The full program and lineup will be released next month. It’s also planning “virtual social opportunities” to facilitate discussions between filmmakers and audience members.

“One of the reasons I started the International Vegan Film Festival was to help people discover outstanding vegan-themed films they have not heard of before or may never had an opportunity to see. I also wanted to give vegan themed filmmakers another platform to highlight their work to more audiences. You can discover and re-discover the enormous positive impact becoming vegan can have on health, farmed animals, and the environment through the film festival. With the festival now going online, we are making it even easier for people to discover these outstanding films.”

Judges

The Festival judging panel includes a who’s-who of the vegan world, including Miyoko Schinner, the founder of Miyoko’s Creamery, Dale Vince, CEO of Ecotricity—the UK’s first and largest green energy provider—and owner of the all-vegan Forest Green Rovers football club, as well as David Flynn, one of the twin brothers behind Irelands vegan ‘foodie empire’ Happy Pear.

As well, Seth Tibbott, the founder and Chairman of The Tofurky Company and author of In Search of the Wild Tofurky, has recently agreed to join this year’s IVFFF Photo Essay Contest judging panel.

Vegan Photo Essay Contestsubmissions close Aug 31, 2020

Aside from the film festival, they also put on other initiatives such as a virtual screening in partnership with We Animals, and a Photo Essay to showcase creativity amongst professional and amateur photographers. Until August 31, 2020, applicants can submit a series of 3-5 images depicting vegan lifestyle, health and nutrition, animal welfare, or environmental protection. Winners will be announced during the festival in October and will also receive a $250 CAD cash prize.The jury is seeking a sequence of images that conveys a compelling story or message – with each image strong enough to stand on its own while conveying a greater narrative when viewed in the photographer’s desired sequence.

Stratton says, “The Vegan Photo Essay Contest is a great way for anyone with a camera and a story, not just professionals, to be involved in the festival.” The contest even has a Youth category to encourage young people to become more involved in sharing vegan themed stories. 



Download Your FREE Vegan PDF HERE

Order a FREE vegan kit HERE

Download Your FREE Dairy-Free PDF HERE

Take the Dairy-Free Challenge HERE

Click HERE for more Dairy-Free

Fish alternatives can be found HERE

Learn about eggs HERE

Find bacon alternatives HERE

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Searching for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics, Personal-Care Products, Vegan Products, or more? Click HERE to search.

Click HERE to find out How to Wear Vegan!

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

PETA HERE

Vegan Outreach HERE

Get your FREE Activist Kit from PETA, including stickers, leaflets, and guide HERE

Have questions? Click HERE



Kindness lingers at the tip of our fingers

Karen Lyons Kalmenson

1,755,894,203

August 24, 2020
by

 

Source Medium
By Beth Levine

As I write this sentence,

the number increases to

1,755,904,721.

It’s a counter like a clock counting

seconds except

at a much faster rate of change

because in five seconds

the number grows by 10,500 –

in 10 minutes, it increases about 1,260,000 —

and instead of starting over after 12 hours, this clock

starts over after a year

and instead of measuring time, this clock

keeps track of death.

The kill clock counts

the number of animals slaughtered

for food in the U.S. alone.

Now two days after starting this poem,

it is January 14, 2020 at about 2 pm

and the clock reads 2,057 442,510.

Thirteen minutes later, almost a million-and-a-half more

chickens, turkeys, cows, pigs, ducks, sheep, fish, and shellfish

have been killed.

By the end of 2020, the deaths of 55 billion

land-and-sea animals

will be recorded.

This number doesn’t include

the yearly toll of 23 billion sea creatures accidently killed

or the 68 billion small fish who are fed

to larger fish for our frying pans or the millions of male baby chicks

ground up because they are no good

to the egg industry or the millions of baby calves of no use

to the dairy industry or those who don’t make it to the kill floor.

The Animal Kill Clock does not measure a dimension that is unstoppable

like the watch that tells time.

The Animal Kill Clock changes only at one’s discretion

and measures our fairness.



Please click HERE to visit the US 2020 Animal Clock , UK HERE , Canada HERE , Australia HERE



Click HERE to go Dairy-Free

Take the Dairy-Free Challenge HERE

Learn about eggs HERE

Download Your FREE Vegan PDF HERE

Order a FREE vegan kit: HERE

Bacon alternatives HERE

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Searching for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics, Personal-Care Products, Vegan Products, or more?
Click HERE to search.

Click HERE to find out How to Wear Vegan!

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

PETA: HERE

Vegan Outreach: HERE

Get your FREE Activist Kit from PETA, including stickers, leaflets, and guide HERE

Have questions? Click HERE

The Suffering of Babies

August 17, 2020
by



Please note that if you consume animals, you should view this brief glimpse into their hell, they have a right to know who’s eating them.

Please also note that although this short video documents UK-based farms, these procedures and “living” conditions are globally standard, considered routine and socially accepted. The US, specifically, denies federal protection for all animals exploited for food, and poultry CAFOs are defined as housing for 125,000 animals. Your Free-Range, Red Tractor, and High Welfare categorizations are used to describe a process that controls animals; subjects them to routine bodily intrusion; inflicts pain sans pain-relief (determined to be cost-prohibitive and illegal due to flesh contamination); rejects body autonomy; and violently kills animals, and, therefore, are meant to make humans, and not the actual animals, feel comfortable.

Additionally, poultry in the US are subjected to diseases and conditions including leukosis, septicaemia, airsacculitis, synovitis, and tumors. They are also found dead, listed as cadavers, which includes being boiled to death.

The following is a USDA public government documentation of the victims consumed, begin on page 12 for condemnation reasons:

https://www.nass.usda.gov/Publications/Todays_Reports/reports/pslaan19.pdf

One final comment: if you are unable to exist without consuming flesh, you’ll be happy to learn that there are alternatives that your inner zombie will find satisfying. Please see below for resources.  SL



Source Animal Equality UK

Undercover filming at eight Moy Park farms reveals hundreds of birds suffering agonising deaths each day.

Animal Equality has today released distressing scenes of severe animal suffering on eight British chicken farms across Lincolnshire and Nottinghamshire. All of the farms are certified by the Red Tractor assurance scheme and operated by Moy Park, one of the UK’s largest chicken producers. Moy Park supplies the fast-food chain McDonald’s, as well as supermarkets such as Tesco and Ocado.

The troubling footage, captured covertly by an Animal Equality undercover investigator, reveals:

  • Chickens deprived of water as drinkers are routinely raised to a height that they are unable to reach;
  • Hundreds of chickens suffering agonising deaths each day as workers painfully crush the chicks’ necks in their hands;
  • Chickens developing raw skin burns on their feet and chests from filthy, urine-soaked floors;
  • Chickens bred to grow so big, so quickly, that they suffer from excruciating leg injuries and are unable to carry the weight of their own oversized bodies;
  • Chickens crammed into immensely overcrowded barns, barely able to move or stretch their wings.

The filming took place in late 2019. The footage was passed on to Defra’s Animal and Plant Health Agency, the RSPCA, and Red Tractor in early 2020.

Business as usual

These concerning scenes are reflective of an industry that values profit over animal welfare. Chickens raised for meat have been selectively bred over time to grow extremely large, incredibly quickly. As a result, many of them suffer from weak hearts, lungs and legs, their bodies burdened by the strain of their unnaturally heavy bodies. After all this, they’re killed when they’re little more than one month old.

Despite McDonald’s closing its doors earlier in the year, the chain’s supplier, Moy Park, has continued business as usual. Although it saw one factory worker tragically die in May from COVID-19, it has publicly stated that it does not expected to be “significantly impacted” by the pandemic. According to the company’s latest accounts, Moy Park saw revenues of over £1.5 billion in 2019, with reports of “strong financial performance” and with Chief Executive, Chris Kirke, receiving a salary of £700,000.

Not the first time

Concerningly, two of the farms investigated have been the centre of previous serious animal welfare complaints.

Animal Equality filmed similarly poor conditions when last year, we filmed inside Mount Farm, along with two other Moy Park farms. The investigation, released in June 2019, showed chickens crammed into gigantic sheds, in obvious pain from leg and breathing difficulties and being forced to live amongst rotting carcasses. It’s clear that neither Moy Park nor Red Tractor took the animal suffering we found seriously.

In July 2019, thousands of chickens were found to have died at Kettlethorpe Farm due to a sweltering heatwave and lack of appropriate ventilation.

Unrelenting greed

Upon reviewing the footage, Abigail Penny, Executive Director of Animal Equality UK, said: “These poor chickens never stood a chance. Moy Park’s actions are consistently underpinned by profit; this is a company that spends an eye-watering £700,000 on a CEO salary, yet instructs workers to kill vulnerable chicks at just a few days old, simply because they’re no longer considered profitable. Moy Park’s greed is unrelenting.”

She added: “McDonald’s, Tesco, Ocado and others buying from this supplier are refusing to show even the smallest ounce of mercy to these innocent chickens. Consumers appalled by these practices can go vegan and do better by chickens today.”

You have the power to make a difference for chickens. With every meal, you can spare them from a lifetime of suffering. Please, leave chickens off your plate today – visit our loveveg.uk website to get started.



Download Your FREE Vegan PDF HERE

Order a FREE vegan kit HERE

Download Your FREE Dairy-Free PDF HERE

Take the Dairy-Free Challenge HERE

Click HERE for more Dairy-Free

Fish alternatives can be found HERE

Learn about eggs HERE

Find bacon alternatives HERE

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Searching for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics, Personal-Care Products, Vegan Products, or more?
Click HERE to search.

Click HERE to find out How to Wear Vegan!

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

PETA HERE

Vegan Outreach HERE

Get your FREE Activist Kit from PETA, including stickers, leaflets, and guide HERE

Have questions? Click HERE



no words just tears
will suffice
bottom line..
humans are
not very nice.

Karen Lyons Kalmenson




System shutdowns and the failures of factory farming

August 10, 2020
by

Warning: Graphic Content

A particularly disturbing scene illustrates one method of “euthanasia”, a euphemistic term describing a person sliding a chick’s head off with no hesitation, no remorse.

Animals are “produced” en masse under a human-manufactured moniker of “welfare”. To subject animals to such dismissively indifferent procedures as normalized violence substantiates the fact that “welfare” is only meaningful to humans, and not to the animals who are controlled, violated, and violently killed, in direct contradiction to anything remotely resembling or defining “welfare”.

Please note that exploitation is endemic on all farming sizes, be they small or locally owned 20-animal operations, or CAFOs confining 125,000 animals. And all animals exploited for food in the United States are specifically exempt from the Animal Welfare Act.  SL

Source We Animals Media and We Animals Media YouTube
Text and video by Kelly Guerin
Images by Jo-Anne McArthur

 

Meat processing plants, or slaughterhouses, have been making headlines these past months as epicenters of the coronavirus pandemic. Outbreaks of positive cases amongst workers have caused the industry’s rapid processing lines to slow or stop for days on end, resulting in a pileup of tens of millions of animals who have reached slaughter weight with nowhere to go.

Much of this burden falls on the farms, which are designed neither to kill nor dispose of animals en masse, and the methods many resort to are truly disturbing. One farmer reported shooting all 3,000 of his pigs over the course of a day. Tanks of carbon dioxide are pumped into barns to gas and suffocate chickens by the thousands. Recently, undercover footage from a pig farm in Iowa documented a deliberate ventilation shutdown followed by the release of hot steam into a barn full of live animals. With temperatures in excess of 140 degrees, the animals inside were slowly roasted.

As a practice, the culling and subsequent disposal of animals en masse pre-dates the current Covid-19 outbreak. It’s the unfortunate answer from a system whose scale defies logic to the challenges presented by unanticipated supply chain disruptions. As factory farms continue to grow in size, and supply chains become increasingly monopolized, times of crisis reveal troubling vulnerabilities in the American food system. The close confinement of factory farmed animals is a death sentence when lethal strains of swine or avian flu spark an outbreak. Rescue is not an option for the millions of chickens or tens of thousands of pigs who become immediately trapped in the face of catastrophic events like hurricanes, tornadoes, or fires. Each time any one of these indisputable disasters strikes, massive numbers of animals are killed, yet each time the numbers are reported, they still continue to astound us.

The number of animals that have and will continue to be culled in the wake of Covid-19 represent a mere fraction of those who are killed for our consumption every single day. Their deaths, now newsworthy, reveal the failings of a system destined to repeat itself.



Click HERE to go Dairy-Free

Take the Dairy-Free Challenge HERE

Learn about eggs HERE

Download Your FREE Vegan PDF HERE

Order a FREE vegan kit: HERE

Bacon alternatives HERE

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Searching for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics, Personal-Care Products, Vegan Products, or more?
Click HERE to search.

Click HERE to find out How to Wear Vegan!

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

PETA: HERE

Vegan Outreach: HERE

Get your FREE Activist Kit from PETA, including stickers, leaflets, and guide HERE

Have questions? Click HERE



When cruelties such as this exist in any society, that society itself has shut down

Karen Lyons Kalmenson




I Was a Journalist Who Reported on Captive Animals — Then I Became One

August 3, 2020
by

An elephant performing tricks at a circus. Germany, 2016.

An elephant performing tricks at a circus. Germany, 2016.
Source We Animals Media : Jo-Anne McArthur / Born Free Foundation

 

Source Medium: tenderly
By Christina M. Russo

After being damaged in a surgery, I understand their plight even more.

I do not have coronavirus. But I have been living in isolation.

For 633 days.

In October 2018, I had an elective gynecological surgery called a laparoscopic myomectomy — a benign mass removed from my uterus. There was no indication that this operation was particularly complex or risky. The surgery was performed by the director of gynecology at one of the top hospitals in the world. The average recovery time was two to six weeks.

But from the moment I awoke in the recovery room, it was clear something had gone terribly wrong. And I have been living in acute, life-altering pain ever since.

Before the surgery, I was an avid hiker. A runner. I worked at my family’s iconic fruit, vegetable and flower company, carrying heavy buckets of hydrangea or field-picked zinnia without a second thought.

I was also a freelance journalist, and just weeks before my operation was the proud co-recipient of a National Press Club award for an exclusive story in the Guardian on the capture of wild elephants in Zimbabwe for Chinese zoos. I had reported for years on animal cruelty, including stories on donkey abuse in Ethiopia; bear dancing in India; deadly swimming-with-dolphin programs in the Caribbean; and the mistreatment of horses in northern California. The award was profoundly meaningful and a photograph of me next to my co-writer of the story showed a beaming, vibrant woman at the apex of her career.

And then it was over.

Post-surgery, I spent months in bed in agony. I called my doctors pleading for help. I could barely walk without crying. I could not urinate without gasping or having someone hold my hand. I could not carry a carton of orange juice. I could not drive. I could not work. All I could do was writhe in pain on the couch, because I could not climb the stairs to my bedroom. My surgeon placated me with hollow assurances that time would heal all things.

Ten months after my surgery, I was still in physical torment. One summer day I decided I would hobble to the beach, 400 yards away. My sister took a photo of me coming home. Crawling.

Friends and family tried to soothe me; my husband took an unpaid leave of absence from the fire department to care for me. I hired someone to make soup for me. I lost 25 pounds. I did acupuncture. I had nerve blocks. I meditated. Still, one of my physicians would not recommend additional pain medicine — and I was taking arguably some of the lowest dosages possible — because of my “heightened despair.” I went to the emergency room four times. Finally — 15 months after surgery — one ER physician admitted me into the hospital, blatantly saying he hadn’t seen a patient in my level of pain in months.

I was going mad.

And then, I got mad. Not just for myself, but for those whose plight I had been exposing before my operation: the innumerable animals confined to their own physical and mental isolation and torment in zoos.

Someone once told me that when people go to zoos and aquariums they think they are seeing something extraordinary. But what they are really seeing is a slow death.

For some, this might seem like a frivolous point when people are dying from a virus that the world is trying to contain and eradicate. But for me, the caged animals represented not only a journalistic career, but, now, a personal kinship.

When I was a child, my parents took me to a zoo on Cape Cod. The “main attraction” was a lone gorilla slumped against a wall in a thick glass cage. Visitors stared at the animal who was sitting on the floor next to a dirty car tire. They saw something foreign, and cartoonish and entertaining. They pointed their fingers and laughed.

I grabbed my father’s hand and cried.

Decades later, I produced a documentary for public radio examining the ethics of American zoos. I conducted many interviews and visited zoos around the country. From a journalistic perspective it was clear that caging animals to serve as “conservation ambassadors” for the wild is a misguided, if not entirely bogus notion. If it were working, maybe we wouldn’t be in a global conservation crisis.

After living almost entirely inside my home for 21 months, the images that have always haunted me are now turning into an unrivaled simpatico: A massive male elephant confined to an exhibit the size of my neighbor’s garage. An official zoo training video that showed an elephant screaming as men beat and bloodied her into submission. A binturong in a tiny cage with a single bowl of water that was green with stagnant algae. A lone, sickly yak who was literally eating the inside of his wooden stall. A camel with legs covered in diarrhea. A pair of African white rhinos lying nose-to-nose in a barren enclosure, continents away from where they should have been. And at one zoo, supposedly one of the best in the country, I was led to a neon-lit basement where a stunning silverback gorilla had been living in isolation. For 10 years.

One of the most disturbing images I’ve seen recently is a video, taken by elephant advocate Sharon Pincott of elephants in a zoo in Beijing, walking in circles in concrete, empty cages. In the video, they go round and round and round behind metal bars. And on the outside, noisy visitors clamor and gab. I sent the video to elephant behaviorist Joyce Poole, who has been acting against the internment of elephants in zoos for decades and has seen what one would colloquially call, it all. But this video, she said, left her sobbing.

What drives human beings to cage animals for entertainment? After years of reportage, I ultimately think it’s based on some cocktail of human hubris, a religiously-buoyed belief in our dominion, and even society’s, dare I say, over-reliance on science. For example, there’s the oft-repeated phrase that humans are the only species that knows it is going to die. Who came up with that one? Or that many animals don’t have a sense of self, or communicate in ways that are as sophisticated as us, because it has yet to be proven. These kinds of refrains cement the idea that animals are lesser than. And allow humans en masse to do things to animals they would never do to each other. When it comes right down to it, though, the bottom line is that there are more people who don’t care about the welfare of animals than those who do.

After my surgery, I was at the mercy of my doctors to find the cause of my pain. Initially, I was sure they would do this with fervor. But they didn’t. So, day after day life was the same: Wake up, suffer, talk to doctors, go to sleep. Wake up, suffer, talk to doctors, go to sleep. Anguish, disbelief, and despair eclipsed my once purpose-filled life. And monotony, perhaps one of the most crushing and consuming kinds of agonies, set in. Imagine then, being an animal in a zoo. What if you were in pain? What if you were lonely? What if you wanted to walk beyond the bars? Someone once told me that when people go to zoos and aquariums they think they are seeing something extraordinary. But what they are really seeing is a slow death. In real time.

The coronavirus-spawned isolation is testing people in ways they’ve never been tested before, physically and mentally. And with this isolation, there is an opportunity to ponder. So for the first time in many, many months, I’ve sharpened probably the last remnants of my journalistic pen to write this essay.

The current fear, despair, mania, physical constraint and existential heartache will most likely be temporary for those who have the fortune to survive this virus. And you, dear reader, will have the great gift of being free of your quarantine, your confinement, and your cage.

But for so many magnificent animals, this new world is not novel. Or a dramatic medical measure. Or a safety lockdown. Or a fleeting moment. For animals at the zoo — or in any cage — this is something else. Something far, far more horrible. For them, this is something that you, very briefly, called life.

Christina M. Russo is a freelance journalist, with a focus on animal issues. Published in National Geographic, the Guardian, YaleE360, Outside, Fashionista and others.

tenderly is a vegan magazine, of the Medium family, that’s hopefully devoted to delicious plants, liberated animals, and leading a radical, sustainable, joyful life.



Click HERE to go Dairy-Free

Take the Dairy-Free Challenge HERE

Learn about eggs HERE

Download Your FREE Vegan PDF HERE

Order a FREE vegan kit: HERE

Bacon alternatives HERE

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Searching for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics, Personal-Care Products, Vegan Products, or more?
Click HERE to search.

Click HERE to find out How to Wear Vegan!

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

PETA: HERE

Vegan Outreach: HERE

Get your FREE Activist Kit from PETA, including stickers, leaflets, and guide HERE

Have questions? Click HERE



people can be prisoners of the formulaic
notions outdated
beliefs, archaic
we can also choose
to rise
open our hearts
see with more than
our eyes.

we pray that heal soon and feel better. bless your beautiful soul

Karen Lyons Kalmenson




This vegan kitchen in the African Bush feeds an all-female anti-poaching unit

July 27, 2020
by



Source LiveKindly
By Charlotte Pointing

 

In Zimbabwe’s Lower Zambezi Valley, the world’s first all-female, vegan anti-poaching unit, called Akashinga, is thriving.

The community-driven unit — part of the International Anti-Poaching Foundation (IAPF), founded by former sniper Damien Mander — protects the land and its wildlife from trophy hunters and poachers.

Mander and the Akashinga women were recently the subjects of 2020’s Akashinga: The Brave Ones a documentary produced by Academy Award-winning director James Cameron.

The unit is completely plant-based; everyone is fed by the Akashinga Back to Black Roots Vegan Kitchen and Garden, run by Nicola Kagoro, also known as Chef Cola.

Funded by VegFund since 2018, the kitchen served more than 54,000 meals in 2019. This number is set to grow significantly in the coming years—the IAPF intends to expand its unit by 2025 to 1,000 rangers. Currently, it has 171 rangers, staff, and trainees.

Back to Black Roots Vegan Kitchen and Garden prepares nutritious, tasty camp meals and rations for the Akashinga staff, using locally-sourced traditional foods and, due to its location in the bush, no electricity.

As it grows, the kitchen will use more low-impact tools and technology. It plans to have an orchard for fresh fruit and even intends to construct a cabin to grow mushrooms.

‘Back To Black Roots’

One of the kitchen’s main goals is to encourage more traditional African diets, hence its name “Back to Black Roots”.

For centuries prior to European colonization, people across many African countries ate predominantly vegetarian meals. Chef Cola wants to encourage a shift back to this way of eating, to not only benefit the rangers, but local food suppliers too.

She told VegFund: “We use a lot of dried grains mixed with fresh produce, both vegetables, and fruits. The focus in sourcing is on empowering the local community and supporting small entrepreneurs (who might have banana farms or tomato gardens).”

Another goal of the kitchen is to teach about the environmental, ethical, and health benefits of plant-based living.

Chef Cola was educated via Cornell University’s T. Colin Campbell Center for Nutritional Studies. Dr. T. Colin Campbell, author of the 2004 book The China Study is one of the leading physicians in the plant-based movement.

She said: “I took that knowledge and shared it with my team. We all internalized and continue to reference Dr. T. Colin Campbell in our kitchen and garden.”




Click HERE to go Dairy-Free

Take the Dairy-Free Challenge HERE

Learn about eggs HERE

Download Your FREE Vegan PDF HERE

Order a FREE vegan kit: HERE

Bacon alternatives HERE

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Searching for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics, Personal-Care Products, Vegan Products, or more?
Click HERE to search.

Click HERE to find out How to Wear Vegan!

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

PETA: HERE

Vegan Outreach: HERE

Get your FREE Activist Kit from PETA, including stickers, leaflets, and guide HERE

Have questions? Click HERE



thank you on so many levels that no words could ever suffice




Unseen

July 20, 2020
by



WARNING: Contains some graphic footage that some vegans may find upsetting. If you are not vegan and find the images upsetting, however, consider what the actual victims experience and stop contributing to it.

A warning will come up before the footage begins.

Source Direct Action Everywhere (DxE)

Please sign HERE



DxE trailed a slaughter truck over 700 miles from a Smithfield factory farm in the Utah desert to a newly constructed California slaughterhouse, documenting the violence at every step. The investigation culminated in the groundbreaking, new mini-documentary, Unseen.

Dead, pathogen-laden pigs were left outside the slaughterhouse where wild animals were seen feeding upon them. This presents a proven risk of zoonotic disease transmission, with pigs, birds and even feral cats potentially infecting humans.

Workers cut away infected flesh from slaughtered pigs so they could be sold as healthy, with the removed, infected flesh left outside in open bins.

The diseases brewing inside Smithfield’s farms are being spread around the country, and everyone — animals, workers, and all life on this planet — is in danger.

The COVID-19 crisis has thrust animal agriculture into the public spotlight. People everywhere are waking up to this senseless collision course. Now is the time to call on California to lead the way and take a stance against animal ag. We’re demanding an immediate moratorium prohibiting the construction of new factory farms and slaughterhouses statewide, and phasing them out completely by 2025.

Please see more about DxE HERE





Click HERE to go Dairy-Free

Take the Dairy-Free Challenge HERE

Learn about eggs HERE

Download Your FREE Vegan PDF HERE

Order a FREE vegan kit: HERE

Bacon alternatives HERE

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Searching for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics, Personal-Care Products, Vegan Products, or more?
Click HERE to search.

Click HERE to find out How to Wear Vegan!

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

PETA: HERE

Vegan Outreach: HERE

Get your FREE Activist Kit from PETA, including stickers, leaflets, and guide HERE

Have questions? Click HERE



too hard to watch
too painful to hear
far worse for the
victims
of such
cruelties,
here

Karen Lyons Kalmenson


Exploiting Animals Is Killing Us and the Planet

July 13, 2020
by

sue-coe-1

“My Mother and I Watched a Pig Escape from a Slaughterhouse,” by Sue Coe



Source Common Dreams
By David Nibert



In the cacophony of reports and commentary on the disaster and discord produced by Covid-19, discussion of human treatment of nonhuman animals and its link to the pandemic remains largely nonexistent. In reality, the current catastrophe is but the latest of a long series of tragedies resulting from nonhuman animal exploitation.

When people began capturing and breeding nonhuman animals approximately 10,000 years ago in Eurasia, the confinement and crowding of these other animals led to the development of deadly diseases that infected humans. From smallpox to tuberculous to the measles, such zoonotic diseases caused by animal mistreatment have been calamitous over millennia. Moreover, large scale human violence and warfare was both enabled and promoted by nonhuman animal exploitation. Horses came to be used as instruments of warfare, and cows, pigs, sheep and other nonhuman animals were exploited as rations, allowing the formation of militaristic, nomadic societies that launched constant invasions in search of fresh grazing land and water. As a result, countless people who did not die from these zoonotic diseases died violent deaths at the hands of societies led by the likes of Attila the Hun to Chinggis Khan.

In the 15th century, this deadly system steeped in animal exploitation was unleashed on the rest of the world through European colonization. Even with thousands of years of experience of warfare waged from the backs of horses, the Europeans could never have subdued the resistance of indigenous peoples were it not for the deadly viruses they brought with them, zoonotic diseases that brought unimaginable trauma while decimating populations of indigenous peoples in the Americas and throughout much of the world. A great deal of the land stolen by European colonizers was then used to expand the profitable practice of ranching, an enterprise that led to the continual, violent expropriation of land around the world for increasing numbers of cows and sheep and other nonhuman animals.

The numbers of nonhuman animals exploited as food on the expropriated lands soared and in the early 20th century the virus underlying the catastrophic influenza pandemic of 1918, likely first originating among confined pigs, resulted in an estimated 50 million deaths around the world before settling into the seasonal flu. The exploitation of chickens, ducks, geese and other birds for food likely contributed to the  H2N2 virus of 1957, that led to a million deaths; and the 1968 H3N2 influenza virus that also caused roughly one million deaths. In 2002 the coronavirus SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome), again linked to the consumption of nonhuman animals as food, killed hundreds, while in 2009 the H1N1 influenza virus, believed to have originated in factory farms for pigs on North Carolina, resulted to as many as 500,000 deaths worldwide. In 2012 exploitation of other animals led to the rise of the coronavirus MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) which also killed hundreds, and the present pandemic of the coronavirus Covid-19, again linked to the use of nonhuman animals as food, is now wreaking havoc across the globe.  With tens of billions of nonhuman animals either hunted or farmed in the world’s current world system of food production, future pandemics are all but certain.

If this were not enough reason for seriously challenging the use of other animals as food, the practice is the primary driver of imminent ecological collapse. The practice is a – some scientists argue the – leading cause of the climate emergency. And it is the primary cause of water pollution, ocean destruction, topsoil depletion and the squandering of the earth’s remaining supply of fresh water. Countless indigenous peoples throughout the world remain marginalized while much of their stolen land continues to be used for ranching or feed crop production. While one billion of the world’s human population currently does not have enough food, and thousands of children die daily from conditions related to malnutrition, 70 percent of the world’s agricultural land is used to produce nonhuman animal products, disproportionately for the more affluent. As the climate emergency advances future food shortages are inevitable, and powerful countries around the world are preparing for the race for what is left.

The exploitation of nonhuman animals for the past ten thousand years has been disastrous for human society. At this tragic moment in history, circumstances are crying out for policies and legislation that will rapidly promote the development of a global, plant-based food system.




Click HERE to go Dairy-Free

Take the Dairy-Free Challenge HERE

Learn about eggs HERE

Download Your FREE Vegan PDF HERE

Order a FREE vegan kit: HERE

Bacon alternatives HERE

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Searching for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics, Personal-Care Products, Vegan Products, or more?
Click HERE to search.

Click HERE to find out How to Wear Vegan!

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

PETA: HERE

Vegan Outreach: HERE

Get your FREE Activist Kit from PETA, including stickers, leaflets, and guide HERE

Have questions? Click HERE



animals are here with us not for us…
open your hearts and
join our chorus!!!

Karen Lyons Kalmenson


Sign petition: Kellogg’s, please make it vegan!

July 6, 2020
by

gsomQxWAkEufdtV-800x450-noPad

Please sign petition HERE

Source Herbivore Club



Whilst Kellogg’s does have a number of vegan cereals and products, they could expand this range extensively by simply switching the vitamin D used in their cereals to a plant-based version.

The vitamin D currently used in most of Kellogg’s products is an animal-derived version of vitamin D3. This comes from a substance called lanolin, which is found in sheep’s wool.

Vegans avoid wool and products made from wool for a number of reasons. Firstly, there is an inherent link between the wool industry and the meat industry. Additionally, undercover investigations into the wool industry have shown abuse and horrific treatment of gentle sheep during the sheering process.

Plant-based vitamin D can be in the form of vitamin D2 or a plant-derived D3.

Last year, Animal Aid announced that supermarket giant Asda has swapped the vitamin D in a number of their cereals to a plant-based version, making a number of their own-brand cereals vegan.

This simple swap does nothing to alter the taste or quality of the product, but it does open it up to a huge and ever-growing vegan market.

Please join us in urging Kellogg’s to swap the vitamin D3 in their cereals for a vegan version.

Please sign petition HERE



Click HERE to go Dairy-Free

Take the Dairy-Free Challenge HERE

Learn about eggs HERE

Download Your FREE Vegan PDF HERE

Order a FREE vegan kit: HERE

Bacon alternatives HERE

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Searching for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics, Personal-Care Products, Vegan Products, or more?
Click HERE to search.

Click HERE to find out How to Wear Vegan!

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

PETA: HERE

Vegan Outreach: HERE

Get your FREE Activist Kit from PETA, including stickers, leaflets, and guide HERE

Have questions? Click HERE



so simple a task
not much to ask.

Karen Lyons Kalmenson


Hogwood: A Modern Horror Story

June 29, 2020
by



Please note: when you purchase animals for consumption and select “red tractor” or “high welfare” or “free range” or other characterizations that imply the animals were treated well, remember that the animals were exploited, which requires routine mutilations, bodily intrusions, pain sans pain relief, and violent killing, on ALL sizes of farming operations, just so a human can define their non-consensual sacrifices as beneficial to them.

The animals are denied any contribution to how humans label their required suffering and deaths and what is fundamentally theirs: their bodies.

If treating animals with “care” is important, then “not killing and consuming them” is more so. SL

Source Viva

You are invited to follow our intrepid group of undercover investigators as they expose shocking atrocities inside Hogwood farm. The conspiracy unfolds as we fight against some of the most powerful players in the animal agriculture industry. This is a gripping tale of negligence, greed and inaction, and our unrelenting fight to help the pigs trapped in Hogwood farm.


Hogwood is available at the following:

Amazon Prime Video

Google Play

Apple TV


Background

For three consecutive years, we investigated Hogwood Farm. What we found shocked us to our very core; overcrowding, mutilation, painful lacerations, a complete disregard for welfare, and most hauntingly: live cannibalism.

Hogwood supposedly represents the best of British farming and so it was a huge victory when — after years of relentless campaigning — Red Tractor and Tesco finally dropped Hogwood Farm. Sadly, that was not the end of the Hogwood story.

Hogwood is not just one bad farm. This level of cruelty and complete disregard for the lives and wellbeing of farmed animals is endemic in the industry. You simply cannot have high welfare on factory farms; it is a cruel industry that is responsible for unimaginable levels of animal suffering. The public has a right to know the truth about UK farming. They have a right to see beyond the web of lies created by huge corporations and government bodies and the right to choose a compassionate, kinder lifestyle.


“I truly believe HOGWOOD can change the hearts and minds of all who watch it. This powerful documentary could put an end to the damaging animal industries which threaten our very existence. HOGWOOD must be shared far and wide.”  – Peter Egan



Click HERE to go Dairy-Free

Take the Dairy-Free Challenge HERE

Learn about eggs HERE

Download Your FREE Vegan PDF HERE

Order a FREE vegan kit: HERE

Bacon alternatives HERE

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Searching for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics, Personal-Care Products, Vegan Products, or more?
Click HERE to search.

Click HERE to find out How to Wear Vegan!

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

PETA: HERE

Vegan Outreach: HERE

Get your FREE Activist Kit from PETA, including stickers, leaflets, and guide HERE

Have questions? Click HERE



we sit in fear
on this “farm” here
please answer our
cries
we do not
want to
die

Karen Lyons Kalmenson




The Animal Holocaust depicted through Art

June 22, 2020
by



Source Jo Frederiks , YouTube

With Special Thanks to A Well-Fed World , Humane Facts

Contacts

facebook.com/Jo.Frederiks

bluethumb.com.au/jo-frederiks

instagram.com/JoFrederiks

twitter.com/JoFrederiks

 


Click HERE to go Dairy-Free

Take the Dairy-Free Challenge HERE

Learn about eggs HERE

Order a FREE vegan kit: http://www.peta.org/living/food/free-vegan-starter-kit/

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Searching for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics, Personal-Care Products, Vegan Products, or more?
Click HERE to search.

Click HERE to find out How to Wear Vegan!

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

PETA: https://www.petaliterature.com/

Vegan Outreach: https://veganoutreach.org/order-form/

Get your FREE Activist Kit from PETA, including stickers, leaflets, and guide HERE

Have questions? Click HERE



an image speaks far more words
than our language can say.
a better world than this
we all strive for and pray.

Karen Lyons Kalmenson


I Worked Undercover Inside a Slaughterhouse

June 15, 2020
by

58d12407d8681-detail

Source We Animals Media : Jo-Anne McArthur / Essere Animali




 

Source The Doe
By Alan G, Activist Progressive / Millennial



A scathing look at the animal cruelty inside a slaughterhouse, from an investigator, vegan and activist.

“I can’t save any of them.” That’s what I reminded myself, day after day, as I looked upon the faces of the animals who would soon be slaughtered. “Just do what you came here to do,” I would add, locking my eyes forward to concentrate on the task at hand. There’s no time to stop and be sentimental.

At a slaughterhouse, there’s always work to be done.

During the years I was an undercover investigator, I worked at three slaughterhouses in three different states—on behalf of a national farmed animal protection organization. While working, I used hidden camera equipment to document the painful reality of what animals endure on the last day of their lives.

I often asked myself how I ended up where I was. Like a lot of people in the vegan movement, I would call myself an animal lover. When I was young, I only had a few career goals. After seeing Jurassic Park, I wanted to grow up and study reptiles. Then, after consuming copious comic books, I wanted to be a hero. I combined these goals and eventually earned a master’s degree in ecology, with the goal of doing conservation research to protect wild animals. But, while I was in school, I learned about the suffering of farm animals through a labmate, the first vegan I ever knew in real life.

You probably guessed this already, but after a lengthy process, I became a vegan as well. Why wouldn’t I? Not only is meat production cruel, but it’s also notoriously bad for the environment, in terms of land use and emissions. So, it appealed to me as someone interested in conservation. In fact, I was so entranced with veganism and its benefits that I decided to keep my career options somewhat open. I wanted to either end up in field research or in activism. The non-profit I continue to work for today was the first to respond to my resume, which eventually brought me to those slaughterhouses.

I ended up working at chicken, pig and lamb slaughter facilities before I retired from fieldwork. I saw cruelty everywhere I went: some intentional and some as a result of companies trying to maximize speed (and, therefore, profits).

The Chicken Slaughterhouse: Animal Cruelty Bordering on Torture

My first job undercover was at the poultry plant, working live hang. Our one job was to pull chickens off a conveyor belt and wedge their legs in shackles passing by at eye-level. We were supposed to handle 24 chickens per minute, an impossible timeframe for anything even resembling “humane.” The birds would struggle; they would flap their wings or defecate out of fear, releasing feathers, blood and feces everywhere. The other workers seemed unconcerned with their plight. They would tear feathers off to throw at one another, or press the bodies of chickens against the metal conveyor belt in retaliation against their struggling. Sometimes, the workers at the head of the line would take a few steps back and hurl the birds at the shackles like they were baseballs. Often, the birds would successfully end up in the shackles after these pitches. It was easy to see that the workers had practiced this method.


The Pig Slaughterhouse: Inhumane Methods of Killing

My second position was at a slaughterhouse supplying a household name in pork products. I ended up working two different jobs there, one of which was on the kill floor. Part of the job was herding the animals through chutes and pens until they reached the stunner. Afraid and/or injured, sometimes they wouldn’t want to move—or simply couldn’t. And when the pigs weren’t moving, the workers started to become violent.

We had “rattle paddles” which look like oars with the flat end filled with noise-making beads. Workers would raise these paddles above their heads and bring them down on the heads or bodies of pigs. Several times, I was admonished by others for not doing this. “Hit them! Hit them!” they would yell at me. We also had access to electrical prods, which other workers would use on animals multiple times, sometimes in the face or near the genitals. The sick ones would be pulled by their tails or shoved out of the pens. We were supposed to use a sled to do that, but a supervisor told me they just didn’t have the time.

When the animals got past the chutes, a worker would use an electrical stunner on them. The hogs would go rigid and fall down a slide to a conveyor belt below. There, a worker would cut their throats. If the cut wasn’t done correctly, the animal wouldn’t bleed out enough to kill them before the stunning wore off, so I documented several pigs returning to sensibility and attempting to right themselves while they were hanging upside down, bleeding from the gaping hole in their throats. Workers were supposed to stop the line to re-stun the animal, but in one instance I witnessed, they didn’t bother, leaving the animal to suffer as the shackle took him slowly towards tanks of scalding water. I remember a choice quote from one worker: “If USDA were around, they could shut us down.”


The Lamb Slaughterhouse: Processing Contaminated Meat

My final investigation was at a slaughterhouse for one of the largest lamb producers in the U.S. I spent a few months working in a refrigerated room all day. The supervisor would tell workers to change the “best by” date labels on older products to falsify their freshness. He would help people avoid putting product through the metal detectors to save time, risking contamination of the meat with metal shavings. And when I finally got a position that would help me observe the slaughter process, we discovered that after having their throats cut open, 90 percent of the lambs would move in response to having their tails cut off later on the line, indicating they were potentially still sensible. What we saw was so egregious we decided to file a False Claims Act against the company, which resulted in a historic intervention from the Department of Justice, a settlement and mandated changes to their slaughtering practices.


Slaughterhouse Workers Suffer, Too

Slaughterhouse practices don’t just cause suffering for the animals. Meatpacking plants are notoriously dangerous for workers, with two amputations occurring in the U.S. per week. Most of my jobs were basically assembly line jobs, with workers performing the same action hundreds or thousands of times per day. Injuries are common, especially those caused by the repetitive motions on the line. I remember my hands aching every minute while I was employed in live hang, my knuckles red from holding the bony legs of thousands of chickens.

In another job, I wore a back brace on top of another because I spent all day carrying boxes filled with lamb meat. I cut myself on knives and metal hangers at the pig plant. More than once, I cried in my car before a shift, anticipating the mental and physical anguish I would endure for the next 12 hours. (And, now, during the coronavirus pandemic many Americans are painfully aware of how disease can spread like wildfire inside of these facilities.)

Though all of that is behind me now, it is still the reality for the billions of animals who are slaughtered every year. While I’m retired from undercover work, I’m still very much an activist for animals. As part of my job, I work with footage from other investigators and witness the same cruelty I saw firsthand. But it’s worth it, because I want people to see what I saw, as hard as it can be to watch. Despite the efforts of investigators like myself, there are still so many people who have no idea where their “food” comes from, and what horrible atrocities they’re paying into by buying animal products. My hope is that everyone who is even a little curious about what I went through can take the time to watch some of the footage brought back from these facilities. As someone who was on the inside, I hope the reality of the plight reaches you.



Click HERE to go Dairy-Free

Take the Dairy-Free Challenge HERE

Learn about eggs HERE

Order a FREE vegan kit: http://www.peta.org/living/food/free-vegan-starter-kit/

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Searching for Cruelty-Free Cosmetics, Personal-Care Products, Vegan Products, or more?
Click HERE to search.

Click HERE to find out How to Wear Vegan!

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend:

PETA: https://www.petaliterature.com/

Vegan Outreach: https://veganoutreach.org/order-form/

Get your FREE Activist Kit from PETA, including stickers, leaflets, and guide HERE

Have questions? Click HERE



you can find your heartbeats
as they progress
each beat cries out
to an animal in distress..

Karen Lyons Kalmenson




M4nic Digression

Bipolar, bisexual and vegan. Blogging for myself. Currently stable...ish. A blog that critics are describing as "all over the place" and "lousy with errors".

Aloe Veritas

Arts and Letters of the Earth

Cosmic Skeptic

Question Everything

Striking at the Roots

Animal activism around the world

The Plantbase Patriot-Midwest

Thoughts on Health, Nutrition and whatever else is on my mind

Veganista

news∙food∙life

World Animals Voice

Animal news from around the world.

Purplerays

spiritual enlightenment and self improvement

The Bruges Vegan

more than waffles and chocolate

DirtNKids Blog

Soil, Kids, Vegan -- Connected Through Nature

Amici del Lupo - Svizzera italiana

per sensibilizzare e farlo conoscere...

Animalista Untamed

The only good cage is an empty cage

Jet Eliot

Travel and Wildlife Adventures

Organic Opinion

Finding it, aye there's the rub~

Flawless Pandemonium

Question everything~

Veganism is Nonviolence

Being Vegan Is A First Step To A Nonviolent Life

The Biotrotter

The Globetrotting Biologists