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Until he extends the circle of his compassion to all living things, man will not himself find peace.

Albert Schweitzer, French philosopher, physician, and musician (Nobel 1952)

The Rescue of Kukkuta and the Rooster Dilemma

June 18, 2018
by

Source United Poultry Concerns
By Hope Bohanec

On the Saturday before Easter I got a call from a friend who was worried about an injured rooster in the Walgreens parking lot about five minutes from my house. A feral population of roosters and hens have made their home in the fields of tall grass and parking lots around Peet’s Coffee and Walgreens in Cotati, California. It’s the same area where I recently rescued a mama hen and her six newborn chicks and took them to a local farmed animal sanctuary. The chickens have become a novelty around there. Peet’s puts out water for them and people come just to hang out with the colorful birds, feeding them bits of scone and taking their pictures. But the population is growing and more and more roosters are being dumped there.

Kukkuta bloodied and laying on the pavement

Source UPC, Hope Bohanec

I drove out to see what was going on and there was a police car parked outside the Walgreens. I asked the officer if she was there because of the rooster and she said yes, that Walgreens had called the Cotati police concerned about him. Apparently a larger rooster had been bullying him for hours. We found him lying on the ground in the middle of a parking space with blood splattered around him on the pavement. The triumphant rooster was pacing back and forth, hovering over him on the curb. We shooed away the tormenter and had a look at the poor guy. He was frozen in shock. His face, head, neck, and comb were covered in murky blood and his left eye was swollen shut with fresh blood dripping out of it.

I asked what she was going to do and she didn’t know. I sat next to the pitiful little guy and was able to put him in my lap and get a good look. He had a lot of blood on him, but the only injury I could find was to his eye. I couldn’t find any wound on his body or neck or comb. I told her there was a good chance he could recover, but she said they would probably “put him down” as no one would want to drive him all the way up to Animal Control on Easter weekend. He would likely be euthanized at Animal Control anyway, so I ended up with a rooster in my car. I knew he would be my responsibility. I had just tried to help someone find a home for a rooster a few weeks before and no sanctuary in the area could take a rooster, but there was no other choice. His life was in my hands.

Kukkuta resting in a carrying crate with drinking water

Source UPC, Hope Bohanec

For seven days he didn’t move. We put him on soft towels in an animal carrying crate and he just sat, frozen. The poor soul was so traumatized. He was not interested in food or water. We tried to entice him with blueberries, pasta, apples, rice, bananas; nothing worked. His eye was so swollen it was the size of a marble and the blood had dried stiff and black all over his head. I got some antibiotic cream and applied it twice a day. A few times, I took him out of the crate and set him in the sun for a while, trying to enliven him, but he would just sit, motionless and listless. Every morning I ran to the crate to check on him, so afraid that he might have died during the night. We named him Kukkuta (which means rooster in Sanskrit).


 

Being vegan for 28 years, I have long respected chickens’ lives, but I had never lived with a chicken. Kukkuta has awakened something incredibly special in me. I love him so much, and while I had a strong vegan philosophy before, now more than ever I simply can’t imagine anyone purposely killing a sentient individual like Kukkuta. It’s a different level of unimaginable now. Everything in me wants to protect him and keep him alive. This is a love I wish everyone could experience, for you can never again think of harming an animal after knowing this kind of love and compassion.


The Tragedy of Unwanted Roosters

Kukkuta needed to be rescued because people eat eggs. You don’t see the connection? Let me lay it out for you. Because of the tireless work of animal advocacy organizations like United Poultry Concerns, there’s a growing awareness that hens suffer in the egg industry. In Sonoma County, people have bought into the “farm to table” ethos and want a more natural and “humane” experience. The area is largely wealthy and people not only in rural areas, but in suburbs and neighborhoods near downtown, are buying chicks from feed stores and off Craigslist and raising their own chickens for eggs.

This may seem like a positive trend, but there is a hidden hindrance – for every hen born, so is a rooster.

Roosters are unwanted because, of course, they don’t lay eggs. They also crow so they aren’t welcome, or even legal to keep, in many neighborhoods. Most areas of Sonoma County will allow up to 12 hens, but no roosters. Because they are worthless to the egg industry, male chicks are killed just hours after emerging from their shells in the hatcheries. They are thrown away alive by the billions, dumped into huge trash bins to suffocate on the weight of their brothers and die slowly of dehydration or freezing to death. Many are ground up alive in maceration machines where sharp blades like huge blenders chop up their tiny bodies for fertilizer, pet food and other products.

Determining the sex of a chick is not an exact science, so many males are shipped to feed stores and sold as hens. A backyard “enthusiast” discovers that one of her “hens” is a male so she “gets rid” of him. It’s increasingly difficult to find homes for roosters. Overwhelmed animal shelters end up euthanizing most of them. Other roosters get dumped on the side of the road. This is what’s happening in Cotati at Peet’s Coffee. People see chickens there, so they dump their unwanted rooster thinking he will be fine, but not necessarily. Roosters are territorial, and as the numbers increase, the newcomer may have to face a bird defending his territory and be injured, stressed or even killed. My guess is that this is what happened to our sweet rooster.

Kukkuta standing on a fallen log

Source UPC, Hope Bohanec

Kukkuta’s Road to Recovery

Slowly the swelling of Kukkuta’s eye subsided and on the seventh day of being a guest in our small backyard, he stood up and walked out of the crate and started drinking some water. We were thrilled! He dunked his head under the water again and again, washing the crusted blood off his face and comb. The next morning we heard him crow for the first time and it was a joyful sound! A robust celebration of life! He is doing great now and he has been a perfect gentleman, never pecking when I reach for him or kicking when I pick him up. He is a gentle soul.

 At first he needed about a four foot radius around us, unsure of his rescuers’ intent. But now he comes right up, following us around the yard and crowing when we go inside because he misses us. He will come right up to the sliding glass door on the deck and hang out, peering in, waiting for our attention. He talks to us with sweet clucks, bocks, and coos of affection and gratitude when we give him food. He is so full of life, busy all day and loves to interact with us. We are mesmerized watching him.

A New Level of Love

Being vegan for 28 years, I have long respected chickens’ lives, but I had never lived with a chicken. Kukkuta has awakened something incredibly special in me. I love him so much, and while I had a strong vegan philosophy before, now more than ever I simply can’t imagine anyone purposely killing a sentient individual like Kukkuta. It’s a different level of unimaginable now. Everything in me wants to protect him and keep him alive. This is a love I wish everyone could experience, for you can never again think of harming an animal after knowing this kind of love and compassion.

My husband and I unfortunately can’t keep Kukkuta because we rent our small duplex. A vegan activist friend who lives out on Cobb Mountain has agreed to adopt him and we are overjoyed that he will be “staying in the family” by going to a vegan home. She has an acre of land and three rescued hens, but no rooster. When she saw my post on Facebook, she and her partner had already been talking about rescuing a rooster to be with their hens. They are setting up and securing a space for him. We are going to miss him so much and we’ve already cried a few times this week thinking about him leaving. But we’re glad he is going to a home with other chickens because he needs friends.

This whole experience has enriched my life, strengthened my understanding of veganism, deepened my commitment to protecting chickens, and most of all, I will never forget my friend Kukkuta.
– Hope Bohanec, May 1, 2018


Hope Bohanec is the Projects Manager for United Poultry Concerns and the author of The Ultimate Betrayal: Is There Happy Meat?.






Order a FREE vegan kit: http://www.peta.org/living/food/free-vegan-starter-kit/

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click on the below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend.

PETA: http://www.petacatalog.com/catalog/Literature-39-1.html

Looking for merchandise? Action for Animals has a very good selection : http://store.afa-online.org/home.php?cat=284

Have questions? Click HERE

 


when will manunkind ever learn
there is no way to micromanage
what is tragic collateral damage.
what we do
who we harm
what we eat.
will ultimately lead
to our own species
defeat!!!

Karen Lyons Kalmenson

 



We’re so vain – thoughts on intelligence

June 11, 2018
by

Source There’s an Elephant in the Room blog
About HERE

Another comment that often appears amongst the arsenal of tired old excuses that humans cling to in their attempts to justify the use of members of other species, centres around presumptions of superior intelligence when compared with every other species on the planet. When asked to provide examples, reference is sometimes made to landmarks of human endeavour such as writing symphonies, great works of literature, major inventions through the ages, and travelling to the moon, amongst others.

Well yes. These are indeed breathtaking achievements, but let’s just stop for a moment and get a grip on reality. Given that we, as a species, currently number some 7.5 billion individuals, there are relatively few humans whose names ring out across the centuries as beacons of intellectual prowess. Da Vinci, Archimedes, Newton, Tesla, Hawking and several others are names that stand out. For the rest of us – the vast majority, that is – no one is ever going to wax lyrical about our towering accomplishments.

What actually is intelligence?

Most of us are simply ordinary people, even though we are surrounded by technological marvels. Our expertise extends to knowing where the ‘on’ and ‘off’ switches are. If one of us were to be left somewhere with no tools or weapons, no instructions, no raw materials and no access to Google, I suspect that no one would ever be able to invent and create a computer for themselves, or write a symphony, or travel to the moon, and rocket scientists would not need to open their ranks to any newcomers. In fact many if not most of us would be seriously challenged to create some form of shelter or find something to eat without a handy supermarket.

To quote Isaac Newton in a letter in 1676:

“If I have seen a little further it is by standing on the shoulders of Giants.”

Although this is similar to a phrase used by the 12th century John of Salisbury, it may even pre-date him as he was known to have adapted and refined the work of others.  Which really serves to illustrate the point that as humans, we are standing on the shoulders of giants, and the majority of us would never have attained the comforts and wonders that surround us, had it not been for the accumulated efforts of others. Thus, for us to claim some level of superior intelligence based on the achievements of the intellectual giants of our species could not even be called tenuous. It’s actually laughable.

So what about ordinary people like me?

So what about just general, common-or-garden intelligence then? When we look deeper into definitions of human intelligence, Wiki provides many angles and measures and it seems like the jury is still out on that one. There are theories about so many aspects; linguistic, logical, spatial, bodily, interpersonal, intrapersonal.  There is no single definition that encompasses everything and I’ve been on the planet long enough to know that few of us would shine in even one of these areas, far less all of them.

Yet it is abundantly clear that despite the limitations that the majority of us have, whatever method by which we decide to define intelligence, however nebulous, however narrow, is the yardstick by which we as a species, generally presume to measure every other. It speaks to our elitist and speciesist mindset that we find and in fact expect to find articles about intelligence  in the human animal separate from articles about intelligence in other animal species.

Looking for the sake of comparison at pages about intelligence in other animal species, I was not particularly surprised to find that the subject seemed to be broken up into a series of anecdotes, many of which are about individuals whose actions were in some way thought notable, combined with sparse paragraphs that say so little about a whole species as to be almost insulting, as well as one or two more lengthy pieces discussing wider issues such as theory of mind in animals. Our recognition of their skills is grudging even at best, frequently couched in surprised or patronising terms, determined that whatever we discover is not indicative of anything that would elevate their status to being worthy of their birthright to live their lives free from the violence and brutality of our merciless exploitation.

Shackles in a slaughterhouse for hens.  Source There’s an Elephant in the Room blog

Life in a mirror

And in just the same way as our definition of ourselves as ‘animal lovers’ astonishingly disregards the copious bloodbath for which we are each personally responsible when we refuse to be vegan, our eager definition of ourselves as ‘intelligent’ includes pinnacles of human achievement that we personally can scarcely even understand, far less ascribe to. Despite this, we claim this ‘human intelligence’ as if it were our own, and we use it as a cudgel with which we bludgeon our way through the lives, the bodies and the habitats of our fellow earthlings; arrogantly assuming that although we have never taken the time to think about how this supposed intelligence manifests itself in the creature we see in the mirror, we are safe to assume that every other species is inferior.

And in just the same way as our definition of ourselves as ‘animal lovers’ astonishingly disregards the copious bloodbath for which we are each personally responsible when we refuse to be vegan, our eager definition of ourselves as ‘intelligent’ includes pinnacles of human achievement that we personally can scarcely even understand, far less ascribe to. Despite this, we claim this ‘human intelligence’ as if it were our own, and we use it as a cudgel with which we bludgeon our way through the lives, the bodies and the habitats of our fellow earthlings; arrogantly assuming that although we have never taken the time to think about how this supposed intelligence manifests itself in the creature we see in the mirror, we are safe to assume that every other species is inferior.

And what exactly is that creature in the mirror doing with all their intelligence? Well I know what the one in my mirror does. She cares for those for whom she feels responsible, looks after the place she thinks of as home, struggles to find a way to acquire the resources she needs to keep herself and those who depend on her fed, clothed, warm, safe and sheltered from the weather. Occasionally she’ll write, she’ll talk with friends, gather information about what others are doing with their time. It’s what I do. And let’s be honest, isn’t that what most of us do?

Recently I have shared a video or two that have been greeted with much delight – I’ll link them at the end. One depicts a tiny bird carefully and with consummate skill, sewing leaves together to create a shelter where she can build her nest. Another video gave an insight into the complex and fascinating life of members of the crow species.

And do you know what they were doing?  They were looking after those for whom they were responsible, looking after the places they regarded as home, struggling to acquire the resources they needed to keep themselves and their dependants fed, safe and sheltered from the weather, gathering information about what others were doing with their time.

Common ground, shared priorities

In short, we have more that connects us with every other species than we care to admit. Each of us is simply living from day to day, caring for family, staying fed and sheltered. That is the level on which most of us function. And when we drop the assumption that we’re so superior to other species, other questions present themselves. Who the hell are we to measure all others by the standards we set – not for ourselves because we know we’re not in the same ballpark – but rather for a few individuals of our species? Who are we to decide that other species are not important enough to live unless they do so exclusively for our interests? And even – how do we actually know that we are the only species in which individuals come along every so often whose brilliance outshines us all?

We are a rather tragic species suffering from a delusion that we are apart from all others, brutalising and destroying our way through our days, rather than acknowledging our role as a part of the interwoven, interdependent network of life and living that is planet Earth. These delusions of ours are dragging the planet we share to the brink of an abyss of our making, a beckoning cataclysm caused by our arrogant assumption that our shared world and everyone who has fur or feathers, scales or wings, have no purpose other than to serve our petty whims and convenience. The end is perilously close, and time is running out for us to stop the behaviour that is causing the problem.

If we don’t wake up, and wake up very soon, it will be too late for every one of us, and being responsible for planetary disaster on an apocalyptic scale is hardly something that any intelligent species would do.

Be vegan.

Information and links:

Tailor bird
Crows
Birds and the Earth's magnetic field
Climate change links for information

 




what is true intelligence
a balanced blend of the creative
and common sense.
learning to fit into the world
not mold it around oneself
caring about the world
we live
and about its health.

Karen Lyons Kalmenson

 

Gun Violence: Striking at the Speciesist Root

June 4, 2018
by

Source Direct Action Everywhere
By Melissa Schachter, MSW

We are in the year of 2018, folks. If you are reading this, you likely live in a first world country and understand a set of values which separate the “no good doers” from the “good doers.”

We are taught at an early age what’s right and wrong. Society reinforces these values in almost everything we do. When we are in preschool, if we hit another child, we are put on timeout.  When we are in high school, if we get in a fight, we get suspended. As an adult, we get arrested. And so it goes on. Every action we take is either encouraged or punished by the society we live in. These sets of values and beliefs have been pushed in our brains since we were children and our tiny little minds were sponges, soaking up all the information we could sustain.

Between birth and 3 years of age the human brain increases to 80% of its adult size. As children, we learn what to do to be rewarded and what to do to be punished. So the “food” that has been fed to us since we could chew is just that, food. We were never taught to ask any questions or find out more about the chicken leg we are being fed for dinner. After all, why would we? If this chicken leg came from an abused animal, we would have been informed by our loving society who would never let any animal die unless the animal really wanted to. This chicken lived a full life and happily gave himself up willingly so that we can feast upon his flesh. Right?

When we hear of stories of someone abusing an animal, people are not only outraged, but experience a strong tug on their heart that crushes a little of their spirit. We often create a picture in our heads of a small puppy or kitten being kicked or tormented by an abuser. The thought of a defenseless animal looking up at their abuser in bewilderment and utter confusion can quite literally make us break down in tears. We demand to know who this abuser is and call for justice from our system that has taught us right from wrong all our lives. Why does picturing an animal being hurt by another human make us so angry? What is it about this picture in our heads that awakens a place in our heart?

As many of you know, on February 14, a gunman set off fire alarms at a high school in Florida, luring teenagers out of their classrooms so that he could open fire with a semi-automatic AR15 assault rifle. This teenager, whose name I refuse to mention, killed 17 people and injured 14 others. Florida and other states are banding together to beg Congress to create stricter gun laws, with the hope that nothing like this will happen to our children again.

The shooter previously talked about shooting small animals and sending his dog over to the neighbors to attack their pigs. Far from an isolated coincidence, the FBI has identified cruelty to animals as a warning sign of more violence to come, and many school shooters and serial killers have a history of abusing animals.

survey found that animals were abused in a shocking 88 percent of homes where physical abuse of human children was present. Society now recognizes animal abuse as a red flag for human violence. And abuse of “pet” animals is already against the law. People are outraged and on alert when dogs or cats are mistreated.

  A mother pig at a Smithfield pig farm languishes in her own waste.

A mother pig at a Smithfield pig farm languishes in her own waste. (Source: Direct Action Everywhere)

Yet over 56 billion farmed animals are killed each year by humans, and much of society doesn’t blink an eye. There seems to be a disconnection between farmed animals and pets. Why do the values of our society that lead us to be outraged by a dog being abused fail to carry over and pertain to a different kind of animal?

Do slaughterhouse workers have the same correlations between animal murders and violence toward humans? According to the PTSD journal, “these employees are hired to kill animals, such as pigs and cows that are largely gentle creatures. Carrying out this action requires workers to disconnect from what they are doing and from the creature standing before them. This emotional dissonance can lead to consequences such as domestic violence, social withdrawal, anxiety, drug and alcohol abuse, and PTSD”.

So just to recap: abusing dogs and cats is statistically proven to lead to violence towards humans. Abusing or killing dogs and cats is against the law. But killing farmed animals who also live a life filled with abuse is not only socially accepted but legal. And statistics also back up slaughterhouse workers developing PTSD and going home to their families with more odds to use physical violence against them as well after a long day of killing farmed animals.

Looks like we have been fooled. We have been fooled by our parents, our families, our teachers, our friends, and they in turn have been fooled by grocery stores, advertisements, TV, magazines, just to name a few. Jokes on us. The meat and dairy industry have taken advantage of our young and sponge-like brains and used it to their benefit to put money in their pockets. And what has been the result? Heart disease, diabetes, cancer, strokes, obesity, pollution, drought, deforestation, climate change, and so many other atrocities, I’m just not able to name them all. But more than all this, we have been fooled that there is such a thing as “humane murder”. We have been taught to believe that we somehow OWN other creatures and that forcing them into a life of enslavement is our right. OUR. RIGHT.

What happened to these ethical values that connect everything else together? I’m just as confused as you are. What went wrong? “Money is the root of all evil”: heard that one before? Society has been tricked into thinking the way we have been taught to do things, is the ONLY way to do things.

The animal rights movement today is challenging societal norms. We are extending our moral values beyond their normal reach.  Living an ethical life is not defined by what is taught to you, and it is not only about living your life without hurting others, but living a life defending those who cannot defend themselves.






Texas Animal Farmer’s Transition to Vegan Activism

May 28, 2018
by
vigil-photos4

Source Free from Harm: The following is an interview between Robert Grillo of Free From Harm and Bessie VonMessenger, a former animal farmer turned vegan activist living in Waco, Texas, whom we recently discovered from footage of a slaughterhouse vigil on Facebook. This is her story.

Source Free from Harm
By Free from Harm Staff Writers

Tell me a bit about your childhood and family life. How did growing up on a farm or farming environment shape who you are?

Growing up on a farm gave me an opportunity to witness the close family and friendships that farm animals have. When I was very young I raised a calf whose mama was sick. He began to see me as his mom and would moo happily when I gave him a hug. I watched him grow to become a strong bull with a heart filled with gentleness and empathy for his herd, as well as for me. When my family loaded him onto the trailer to be sold, I screamed and cried and begged them not to sell my baby, not to take him to the cruel auction house. I can still see that look of sadness in his eyes as we said goodbye.

I was witness to the many joys and heartaches of the animals at our farm. I watched mother cows caring tenderly for their young, and their families watching over the babies as they would stop to eat. I saw herd sires protecting the young as the trailer was loaded with babies to be sent to auction and I heard mama cows crying at the loss of their young. I witnessed chickens developing friendships and roosters protecting  their hens in the mornings when we would collect their eggs. These experiences with the animals eventually opened my eyes to their very real feelings and family connections that make these animals individuals and not products.

What was the catalyst for your transformation from farming to veganism?

It took me learning to turn off the noise of tradition and social conditioning to finally go vegan. The strong memories I hold of the happiness and sadness of the farm animals left an impression on me. I began to understand how very much they are like us. I would never want to be used against my will or have my precious family taken from me and sold to slaughter. I realized neither do the animals want this life of suffering and grief. They want to  live and be happy. You can see that desire clearly in the gentle caring eyes of a mother cow

Please read rest HERE








To grow is to learn
To learn is to grow
There is never enough
Kindness to know

Karen Lyons Kalmenson

 

2018 Veggie Pride Parade in NYC

May 21, 2018
by



Source YouTube, Donny Moss

As hundreds of New Yorkers took to the streets of Greenwich Village to participate in the 2018 Veggie Pride Parade, many onlookers spoke to TheirTurn on camera to give their honest feedback about the parade and its message.




Order a FREE vegan kit: http://www.peta.org/living/food/free-vegan-starter-kit/

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click on the below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend.

PETA: http://www.petacatalog.com/catalog/Literature-39-1.html

Looking for merchandise? Action for Animals has a very good selection : http://store.afa-online.org/home.php?cat=284

Have questions? Click HERE





if we are going to have any future at all
our lives and plates must be kind…
and that is all!

Karen Lyons Kalmenson

 

The Victims of Gun Violence Politicians Won’t Talk About

May 14, 2018
by



Source HuffPost
By Jay Shooster

This piece was co-authored by Rockwell Schwartz, recent graduate of Vassar College’s Science, Technology, & Society program.

A shooting is happening right now at Vassar College. It is the fourth the campus has seen in the past six years. Over 115 have already been killed, their blood spilled on the college fields. Yet, it’s unlikely you’ve heard anything about it. The national media remains silent; not even the local news has covered the grieving families or lost friends. No candlelight vigils, no memorials, no communal mourning, as the victims remain unidentified and seemingly forgotten.

What’s happening at Vassar College should be shocking, but similar shootings have been largely ignored across the country. The annual death toll climbs well into the millions, yet there is no accurate record of the casualties. Why? Because the victims were born as members of the wrong species.

In the brewing national discussion on gun violence, the most numerous victims—animals—are left out of the conversation. For every human life taken by a gun, hundreds, if not thousands, of nonhuman lives have also been taken. Yet for these victims, gun control advocates not only erase their deaths, but also actively promote and protect the killings. We fail to label the unnecessary killing of animals as gun violence, and instead we euphemize and romanticize it as “sportsmanship.”

But hunting is gun violence. A bullet ripping through flesh, puncturing arteries, taking a life is violence no matter the victim’s species. And these deaths are far from as clean and easy as often presented: One study found that more than 1 in 10 deer died only after two or more shots, often suffering for over 15 minutes prior to death. White Buffalo, Inc.—an organization hired by Vassar College to conduct killings on its campus—became the subject of a lawsuit following undercover footage collected at one of its shoots. In one video, a mother deer is shot in the head right in front of her two fawns and she is seen still kicking as a park ranger places a plastic bag over her head. Even when hunting is carried out by paid professionals, there is still suffering and a surge of cortisol-driven terror.

One obstacle to seeing nonhumans as victims of gun violence is our tendency to reduce them to an anonymous collective. Victims matter more to us when we can see them as individuals, such as the rescued animals of Leilani Farm Sanctuary of Maui. We connect to the animals there as individuals because we know their stories. Particularly compelling is the relationship between Veronica the deer and Berney the wild boar. Veronica was rescued after hunters shot her mother in front of her when she was just a fawn. Berney wandered onto the sanctuary as a piglet, clearly also orphaned and searching for safety. Today, these two individuals, both members of commonly hunted species, live in safety. The sanctuary shares anecdotes of Veronica teasing Berney out of jealousy and Berney running over when his name is called. Once we see Veronica and Berney as unique individuals with their own personalities, interests, relationships, and needs, it becomes clear that shooting them would be an act of violence.

At some level, most of us understand that killing animals is wrong. Nobody feels good about telling a child that hunters shot Bambi’s mom. Even staunch hunting advocates will describe it as a necessary evil. Conversely, the public is captivated by stories of hunters saving the animals they had intended to kill. We love to watch the once-villain put his own safety on the line to help an animal in need. We care about these animals and sympathize with their suffering so much that a video posted last month of one doe’s rescue has already garnered over a million views. Understanding their deaths as gun violence—and including their interests in the national conversation—is the logical conclusion.

Following the statements of President Obama, who speaks of his respect for hunters, 2016’s three Democratic hopefuls have paradoxically condemned gun violence while ensuring that gun violence against animals continues undisturbed. This week, Bernie Sanders emphasized that his support for gun safety legislation would “not negatively impact” the hunting community. Hillary Clinton has also noted her “respect” for hunters, and whitewashed the killing of animals simply as “part of a way of life.” Meanwhile, Martin O’Malley has notoriously overseen the controversial Maryland black bear trophy hunt. He touts Maryland’s “comprehensive” gun safety legislation for not interrupting “a single person’s hunting season,” while he criticizes the records of both Sanders and Clinton as inconsistent on gun violence. In the end, it seems all three Democratic candidates, as well as President Obama, are pandering to conservative hunting advocates (and selling out the animals) to market a more palatable plan to stop gun violence against human beings.

We ought to demand more of progressive politicians. The majority of Americans believe that hunting animals is wrong. We must demand that they stop using animals’ lives as bargaining chips to appear moderate or reasonable on gun control. There is absolutely nothing to “respect” about the unnecessary killing of animals. There is nothing wholesome about shooting individuals who want to be free from harm. Hunting is gun violence, and it’s time we start acting like it.







Order a FREE vegan kit: http://www.peta.org/living/food/free-vegan-starter-kit/

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click on the below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend.

PETA: http://www.petacatalog.com/catalog/Literature-39-1.html

Looking for merchandise? Action for Animals has a very good selection : http://store.afa-online.org/home.php?cat=284

Have questions? Click HERE





put away your rifles
pistols and guns
the taking of lives
is no sane persons
idea of fun!!!

Karen Lyons Kalmenson

 

2018 Conscious Eating Conference Videos

May 7, 2018
by

Source United Poultry Concerns (UPC)

UPC’s 7th Annual Conscious Eating Conference Saturday, March 10th, in Berkeley, California, was a huge success! We had an incredibly high caliber of speakers this year who gave insightful and in-depth presentations on important animal rights issues. Enjoy the videos and be sure to join us next year! We thank everyone who attended our conference this year, and we thank our speakers for providing so much nourishing food for thought and action!

All videos in one; presenters include the following:

Justin Van Kleeck, PhD
Animal Farming and the Roots of Speciesism

Adam Karp
Veganic Lawyering, Carnivore-Keeping, and Natalist Ruminations

Karen Davis, PhD
Don’t Just Switch From Beef to Chicken

John Sanbonmatsu, PhD
Lady Macbeth at the Rotisserie: ‘Femivores,’ Violence, and the New Maternalism in Animal Agriculture

Hope Bohanec
Sentience in the Sea

Clifton Roberts
The Humane Party – Animals, Politics, and the Future

Panel Discussion
Question & Answer Session



 

 

 

 

See previous years HERE courtesy Veg4Life




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