Skip to content

Unity ...

Until he extends the circle of his compassion to all living things, man will not himself find peace.

Albert Schweitzer, French philosopher, physician, and musician (Nobel 1952)

What The Health

February 1, 2016
by

Source What The Health

Please click HERE to donate


WHAT THE HEALTH Feature length documentary

What the Health is a ground-breaking, feature-length documentary from the award-winning filmmakers of Cowspiracy, that follows the exciting journey of intrepid filmmaker, Kip Andersen, as he uncovers the impacts of highly-processed industrial animal foods on our personal health and  greater community, and explores why leading health organizations continue to promote the industry despite countless medical studies and research showing deleterious effects of these products on our health.
“This film is a combination of Cowspiracy and Forks Over Knives on steroids.”
 
What separates this film from others on this topic, is that it explores not only the relation of this industry to personal health, but then also how this industry is connected to everything from the pharmaceutical industry, the medical industry, health organizations, and even the government, and its effects on those communities that live next to the production of their products.
This is an extremely urgent topic that must to be exposed to the world and to our loved ones in order to share the truth of what is being hidden from us.

Our Stretch Goal is $108K

 Help us reach our stretch goal and get the film out to the world!

Order a FREE vegan kit: http://www.peta.org/living/food/free-vegan-starter-kit/

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click on the below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend.

PETA: http://www.petacatalog.com/catalog/Literature-39-1.html

Looking for merchandise? Action for Animals has a very good sele : http://store.afa-online.org/home.php?cat=284

Have questions? Click HERE

Read more…

36 Hours Without Water | Draw My Life

January 25, 2016
by



Source Bite Size Vegan

Today I am born.

In three days parts of me will be cut off.

In six months I’ll be dead.

On my way to meet my killers, I’ll travel with my family for 36 hours without water.

Some of us will die in the heat before we arrive. Die too early to be killed.

Have you ever been thirsty?

I’m hungry. I’m trying to get to my mother for milk. We all are.

My brothers and sisters all trying to eat. There isn’t much room. The bars get in the way.

Momma can’t move much but she sings to us while we eat. That’s my favorite, when she sings.

At night my brothers and sisters try to get as close to her as we can but we can’t reach her. We huddle together. The red light keeps us warm. But it’s not Momma.

Day three and it happens. They come. They grab my brother first and I hear him scream. Four times he screams. Loud and sharp.

I’m afraid.

I try to hide. We all do. But there’s nowhere to go. Then the Cutter grabs me and it happens.

A loud noise and my ear is on fire.

I scream.

Something cold it in my mouth and I hear a crunch. My teeth are shorter.

I scream around the cold thing.

Then I’m upside down and feel my tail break.

I scream.

Then the worst pain I’ve ever felt. Something between my legs is ripped from me.

I scream until my voice breaks.

——-

Two weeks later and Momma’s gone. Our food is hard and dry. No more milk. No more singing. No more Momma.

——-

I’m six months old. I feel older. I’m tired and hot. My body aches and I’m dirty. We all are.

The Cutters come and it’s time. Suddenly, light. And they’re pushing us towards it. Pushing and kicking. Screaming and hitting. We’re moving as fast as we can.

And then we stop. Because there’s nowhere to go. We’re tighter together than ever before. And it’s so hot.

Soon we’re panting, all of us, panting. We can’t get away from each other. It’s so hot.

And then we’re moving. Finally some air. But it’s not enough. I try to get closer to the air but there are too many of us. All of us trying.

I think of my Momma again. All of us trying to get to her milk. But there’s no singing here. Only panting. And groans. And cries. And it gets hotter.

——-

It’s nighttime. The sun is gone and we can breathe more slowly.

I’m thirsty. We all are. We’re looking for water or food but there’s nothing.

I’ve made it to the edge and try to smell for any hint of water. Just a drop. Something. We’re dying.

——-

It’s light again. I’m so tired. Too hot to sleep. And it’s getting hotter. All I hear is breathing.

But some of my brothers and sisters aren’t breathing. Not anymore.

We start moving again and I feel we’ve been in here for days. Skin upon skin. We’re so hot it burns when we touch. We’re all trying to get away from each other.

But there’s nowhere to go.

——-

We’re stopping again. Stopping and starting. When we’re still it’s the worst. The heat. I can barely breath.

All I think of is water.

I can smell it, taste it, see it, feel it. Like it’s right there, pouring through the tiny openings that only deliver stale air.

But this time it feels so real. I can almost believe it. Then I hear them. Cutters outside. Cutters looking in. Cutters with water. Finally, water! Is it real?

They’re pouring in water and we’re trying to reach them. Most of us. Some aren’t moving at all.

I open my mouth and it’s cold and it’s real. It’s the most incredible thing I’ve ever tasted.

And these Cutters aren’t screaming or kicking or hitting. They’re almost singing like Momma. Low and soft and kind.

One reaches in and pets my head.

The only time I’ve been touched and not hurt.

And then we’re moving. But not for long. We stop and then bright light and air. Finally, air!

The loud Cutters are back with their kicking and hitting. And something new. Something that shocks. Sharp pain.

And I wonder what’s next.

——-

I’m caught.

I can’t move. Even more than before. There’s nowhere to go.

Just a few of us in here but no room.

And then the burning. Something’s wrong.

Something’s always been wrong.

We’re moving and it burns. Everything burns. My eyes, my mouth, inside. I’m burning inside.

I’m thrashing and trying to escape. We all are.

——-

And now I’m upside down. We’re all upside down. But I’m still moving. Why am I moving?

And then I see them. More Cutters. I’m moving and can’t stop. Then it comes. The last cut I feel. Sharp and deep and hot. And I’m bleeding. Everywhere I’m bleeding.

And then water. I hear water. Finally, water.

And then it happens. I’m dropped into the water and it’s fire. It’s boiling and red with blood. I’m on fire. I can’t breathe.

I think of the cold water and the Cutters who sang like Momma.

And I take my last drink.

——-

This pig’s story is not an isolated incident. To see his story in real life footage, see the videos linked below. From the mutilation of baby pigs to their transport without food or water to the gas chamber and scalding bath, every word is reality. This is not just happening in some far away land.

 






Order a FREE vegan kit: http://www.peta.org/living/food/free-vegan-starter-kit/

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click on the below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend.

PETA: http://www.petacatalog.com/catalog/Literature-39-1.html

Looking for merchandise? Action for Animals has a very good sele : http://store.afa-online.org/home.php?cat=284

Have questions? Click HERE

You can hide from pictures
To words turn a deaf ear
But the heart is always
With you
And the heart always
Hears

Karen Lyons Kalmenson

 


Are Vegans Vegetarians? Part 2

January 18, 2016
by
Wikimedia Commons: Vegan Sandwich

Wikimedia Commons: Vegan Sandwich

Source This Is Hope, The Book
By Will Anderson

In Part 1, I noted that the conversation of what vegetarianism is and is not has been ongoing as a contemporary issue since the early 1800s. In Part 2, I review highlights of the historical context when vegetarianism lost its vegan meaning and the circumstances surrounding the creation of the term “vegan”.

As a preview, Part 3 will demonstrate the multitude of definitions for vegetarianism and veganism as written by organizations A through G. For Part 4 we’ll look at everyday examples of products labeled “vegetarian” and how this leaves everyone guessing about what is in the box, the bottle, restaurant—and organization. I’ll advocate we formally (and compassionately) separate the definition of veganism from any reference to vegetarianism in Part 5. Donald Watson’s comments in his later years are instructive for what veganism must accomplish.

My intent is not to put vegetarians on the defensive. I ask for your patience to follow through this thought exercise with me. Challenging the traditional sense of what “vegetarian” means may, by its nature, make some readers uncomfortable. Please remember this is the same discussion started by the founders of contemporary vegetarianism and veganism.

Our Era

We live in a different era than the founders and early members of vegetarian and vegan societies. We learned from them, built on the  foundation they laid, and thank them. Donald Watson and friends struck out to coin the term “vegan” and founded The Vegan Society because it  was necessary. Circumstances again create another urgent necessity—and opportunity—to rescue veganism from the confusing discourse of vegetarianism.

In our era, we know more than our predecessors about the science-based evidence of sentience, nonhuman personhood, and the physical and psychological needs of individuals from other species. We know more about their communities and experiences as domesticated and exploited individuals—as well as those living in the wild. We have a more accurate and abundant knowledge of nutrition for sustainable raw vegan diets as well as processed food alternatives—available choices that make change to veganism easier than ever before. We have access to amazing educational resources where knowledge is made available to a greater number of people every day, to anyone able to access a book, flier, and the internet.

With all of that, the power and growth of the vegan message and vision are diminished by our ineffectual use of the term “vegan”. This stems from how vegetarian organizations and many of us define and report veganism. We’ve become sloppy. My focus on “vegetarian (-ism)” and “vegan (-ism)” as terms starts with a brief review of when vegetarianism lost its vegan meaning.

In the 1830s, the original use of the word “vegetarian” indicated a person who lived on a vegan and predominantly raw food diet. After the founding of The Vegetarian Society in 1847, the word “vegetarian” came to indicate a diet that allowed eggs and dairy for those who chose to do so. There were debates about that change, but it remains the legacy we inherited. Yet, we still believe that vegans are somehow vegetarians. That causes harm.

In December 1943, Donald Watson gave a talk to The Vegetarian Society on vegetarianism and the use of dairy products. In August 1944, he and others discussed forming a sub-group of non-dairy vegetarians within The Vegetarian Society. The Vegetarian Society eventually refused to give them space in its journal. The non-dairy vegetarians were also non-egg and non- everything animal exploitation but eggs were in scarce supply during these WWII years and not as often mentioned. There was sympathy from the Society, but they felt that “the full energies of the Society must continue to be applied to the task of abolishing flesh-eating”. The creation of the word “vegan” and subsequent founding of The Vegan Society in November, 1944 is often credited to Donald Watson or he and his wife Dorothy but Watson credits a number of his fellow vegans as well.

The Vegan Society revised its definition of veganism over time. In 1969,  it defined “veganism” as: “[…] a philosophy and way of living which seeks to exclude—as far as is possible and practicable—all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose; and by extension, promotes the development and use of animal-free alternatives for the benefit of humans, animals and the environment.”

It is important to remember that the founding of The Vegan Society and its veganism formalized two parallel and cooperating dietary social movements that grew over time to other countries and people. Watson and others believed it was important to stay within the vegetarian movement despite the differences that pained him and other vegans. Note what Watson, who in his address to the International Vegetarian Congress in 1947, said,

 

The vegan believes there is nothing in the idea of vegetarianism so long as this regrettable practice of eating more dairy produce continues. Indeed the use of milk must be a greater crime than the use of flesh-foods, since after all the exploitation of motherhood and calf killing the cow must face the slaughterhouse. Thus the dairy cow suffers far more than the bullock taken from the field and slaughtered.

 

Their decision to remain under the umbrella of vegetarianism is understandable given the relatively small number of people who then self-identified as vegans. Vegetarian and vegan organizations evolved and grew beyond England. In the U.S., the American Vegetarian Society formed in 1850 but ended several years later for a number of financial reasons and deaths of key founders. I found they sounded more like vegans which reflected that many members were at the time. Despite the American Vegetarian Society demise, other vegetarian organizations remained and grew further. The first U.S. vegan society was founded in 1948 in California. They merged into the American Vegan Society that was formed by H. Jay Dinshah and others in 1960.

What was inspiring in the early vegetarian and vegan social movements was their connections to other progressive social movements like the abolition of slavery, women’s suffrage and spiritual betterment, often under the leadership and influence of church congregations that practiced veganism. Here is an example of an 1850 vision for vegetarianism: “Vegetarianism unfolds the universal law of man’s being. Its observance is a stepping-stone to a higher stage of existence, and removes obstruction which hinders the fulfillment of man’s highest aspirations, and it is the inlet to a new and holier life.” Vegetarianism was part of a larger way of living, influencing, and being in the world.

That historic passion by people who sought higher consciousness and purpose still warms vegetarianism. The fact that over time vegetarianism became something different than the veganism that grew from it means some people and organizations today want the original “vegetarianism” brought back as it was before the Vegetarian Society consented to dairy and egg consumption. That is unlikely to succeed for a number of reasons. Perhaps most formidable is the fact that the definitions of vegetarianism and vegetarian are owned internationally by hundreds of millions of people who consume dairy and other animal-derived products. They claim vegetarianism as well.

The vast majority of the world’s vegetarians live in India. At 375 million strong, India vegetarians represent some 70% of the estimated half-billion vegetarians in the world. An overwhelming majority are lacto-vegetarians due to cultural and religious custom that existed long before the English terms vegetarian and vegetarianism were introduced. There are few vegans and resources for vegans in India. Restaurants are identified as vegetarian, non-vegetarian, and pure vegetarian.

Around the world, as in India, wealth taken from ecosystems is annihilating the lives of nonhuman animals. Increasing human prosperity is creating enormous demand for meat, eggs, and dairy. In India, over half of its people describe themselves as omnivores. They and the lacto-vegetarians have made India the leading dairy producer in the world. India’s massive vegetarian population exploits cows and their calves. Despite Hindu dictates about the reverence for cows, they are killed like they are in the U.S. and elsewhere when their productivity declines after a few years. As the reporter in The Hindu wrote in 2014,

 

Beef and milk are two sides of the same coin, especially in India where cattle and buffaloes are farmed primarily for milk. There are no ‘beef’ animals in India. Yet, bovine meat constitutes 62 per cent of India’s total meat production. Beef, in India, is sourced from the dairy industry, which is economically sustainable only because it is supported by the meat and meat by-products industries (such as leather).

 

Being a lacto-vegetarian in India offers no relief for cows and their calves. In addition, much of the cow and buffalo milk is sourced from small rural farming families, likely making change away from milk products slow to come. Still, it is consistent in that vegetarianism anywhere offers no relief. Trying to restore an 1800s definition of vegetarianism would have to overcome entrenched global uses of the word. It is relatively easy to re-establish veganism as a separate term, idea, vision, and solution to the violence and injustice we know so well. If we fail to reclaim the terms vegan and veganism, then “vegetarianism” will continue to state that vegans are vegetarians in a list of definitions so complicated that it harms the vegan movement.

Part 3 will address the core issue of how vegetarian organizations define and use veganism interchangeably with vegetarianism. The chaos this creates undermines chances that veganism will succeed in its promises.

Order a FREE vegan kit: http://www.peta.org/living/food/free-vegan-starter-kit/

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click on the below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend.

PETA: http://www.petacatalog.com/catalog/Literature-39-1.html

Looking for merchandise? Action for Animals has a very good sele : http://store.afa-online.org/home.php?cat=284

Have questions? Click HERE

Read more…

Vegan Supermarket Chain Coming To United States In 2016

January 11, 2016
by
Credit: Veganz

Credit: Veganz

Source True Activist
By Amanda Froelich

Veganz, the world’s first all-vegan supermarket chain, will be opening in Portland, Oregon in 2016.

You’ve heard a plant-based diet is optimal for health and the environment, but do you ever get dismayed when perusing your local grocery store because you a) either don’t know what to buy or b) feel too tempted by conventional products to make healthy choices?

Perhaps your solution is right around the corner… As The Local reports, the world’s first vegan supermarket chain, “Veganz,” which was founded in Berlin, Germany, aims to go international and is set on opening a new location in the United States in 2016.

You can probably relate to the founder of the supermarket, Jan Bredack, who once considered himself a meat lover. He, too, enjoyed Standard European (and American) fare, but eventually got tired of the burn-out from an imbalanced life. After changing his lifestyle and ethical code in 2009, he became inspired to write the book “Vegan für alle: Warum wir richtig leben sollten” (Veganism for everyone: Why we should live right) and create a store plant-based foodies could feel comfortable in.

In 2011, the inspired foodie started the world’s first vegan supermarket and hasn’t looked back.

“The decision to open a vegan supermarket came from a potpourri of ideas after coming across various vegan products in the US and Russia,” he says.

He noted that it was difficult to “shop normally” when one adopts a vegan lifestyle, and he wanted to make the switch to veganism more accessible to everyone.

There are presently two Veganz supermarkets in Berlin, with a third intended to open this year. Stores are also located in Hamburg, Munic, and Frankfurt. On May 13th, Veganz will open its first store outside Germany in Vienna, with further planned for London, Amsterdam, Zurich, Barcelona, Milan, and Copenhagen next year. That’s not all… In 2016, Veganz will open a vegan shopping center in Portland, Oregon, including a shoe and clothing store and restaurant.

The wonderful thing about Bredack and his message is that he doesn’t preach an all-or-nothing approach – or a lifestyle of deprivation. Indeed, Jan is inspired to show the world that plant-based food can be healthy, affordable, and – most importantly, delicious. According to Bredack, 80% of customers are neither vegan nor vegetarian, and the majority seem well-educated.

 

Order a FREE vegan kit: http://www.peta.org/living/food/free-vegan-starter-kit/

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click on the below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend.

PETA: http://www.petacatalog.com/catalog/Literature-39-1.html

Looking for merchandise? Action for Animals has a very good sele : http://store.afa-online.org/home.php?cat=284

Have questions? Click HERE

Read more…

How do I go vegan?

January 4, 2016
by


Source How Do I Go Vegan?

It’s wrong to use animals.  Being fair means going vegan.  Going vegan is easier than ever.  This website will help you get started.

 

Read more…

Happy New Year

December 31, 2015
by



Karen Lyons Kalmenson

Karen Lyons Kalmenson



wrap yourself in a world of love.
by heartaches never be depleted
look upon each day,
in your own special way,
with your spirit,
undefeated.

Karen Lyons Kalmenson

 






Order a FREE vegan kit: http://www.peta.org/living/food/free-vegan-starter-kit/

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click on the below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend.

PETA: http://www.petacatalog.com/catalog/Literature-39-1.html

Looking for merchandise? Action for Animals has a very good sele : http://store.afa-online.org/home.php?cat=284

Have questions? Click HERE

“An open letter to non-vegan holiday hosts” Dr. Casey Taft

December 28, 2015
by
Wikimedia Commons

Wikimedia Commons

Source Vegan Publishers
By Dr. Casey Taft

As Thanksgiving fades into the background and you prepare to see your vegan family member for upcoming holidays, I’d like to say a few things that your loved one may not be able to. I’m not writing this letter to anger or shame you, but rather to encourage you to attempt to develop greater insight into what’s going on with your loved one.

To set the stage, allow me to engage you in a thought experiment that I’d like you to really take seriously. Imagine that you’re going to a holiday event that’s serving a roasted cat as the main dish. Imagine the host “preparing” the dead cat, removing her guts, inserting bread crumbs into her anal cavity, and placing her body in the oven. Later, when the cat is fully cooked, you sit at the table watching others carve up the cat while making merry as if they weren’t eating a cat in front of you. (I’m assuming you’re not partaking in dining on the cat in this scenario.)

End scene. Is the thought of participating in this event upsetting to you? How do you feel about the participants? If you’re like most people, this scenario would be profoundly disturbing. Welcome to the world of being vegan during a non-vegan holiday.

An important aspect of the vegan ethic is that we view all sentient animals as being the same and equally deserving of life. We make no distinctions between the value of a turkey vs. a cat. vs. a dolphin vs. a dog vs. a cow.

The only thing that truly distinguishes these thinking, feeling animals from one another is what we have been taught about their “use.” Society views killing and eating turkeys as acceptable, while other animals are considered off-limits for consumption.

For vegans, all animals are off-limits for consumption, since all think and feel; all have a desire to live, just like us. There is no difference between species in the mind of a vegan. Vegans have unlearned the arbitary distinctions among them, and so it’s every bit as upsetting to witness harm done to a turkey or pig as it is to witness harm done to a cat or a dog. We no longer see a difference like non-vegans do, and many of us have built relationships with animals from these “farmed” animal species as others might with a traditional household pet.

So, if you have a vegan family member coming over for your non-vegan holiday, I’d like for you to be aware that it’s likely very difficult for them. Not only because they have to witness the mutilation and consumption of an animal who wanted to live, but also because they’re observing those they care most about directly participating in it.

I hope you understand that your vegan loved one cares a great deal about you – so much so that they decided to join your event, despite the fact that they may be profoundly upset by your participation in animal suffering. But to be frank, they’re also probably disappointed, because they know you as a kind person, but your participation in this cruelty runs counter to their high regard for you.

I’m guessing that your vegan loved one feels at least some degree of rejection by you because, if you really sought to understand why they chose to go vegan, you’d go vegan yourself. There’s no logical or ethical justification for killing and eating animals, since it’s biologically unnecessary and unhealthy for us. This can be the hardest thing of all for them; they want so much for you to understand their compassion for animals, because it’s a huge part of who they are as a person.

For many vegans, the holidays are also bittersweet because we remember fondly earlier times when we would get together with family and share how we’ve changed and what we’ve learned while living our separate-but-connected lives. That may not be possible when one goes vegan, since many don’t want to hear about how we’ve developed greater compassion for animals and a desire to promote justice for them.

I understand that your response might be “My house, my rules” which is certainly your prerogative. You’re under no obligation to be accommodating to your vegan loved one by having a vegan holiday. However, by the same token, I urge you to respect their decision to refrain from attending future holidays at your home if that’s their choice, as they may similarly need to decide what’s best for them and what they’re able to witness. For some vegans, it’s simply not healthy for them, or your relationship with them, to be exposed to animal cruelty, and they need to decide that for themselves. Many vegans prefer to simply have vegan holidays at their own homes where they can avoid exposure to unnecessary animal cruelty.

So my final request is to really listen to your vegan loved one during the holidays and try to better understand how they’ve changed and why they’re so passionate about helping animals. Perhaps next holiday season you can show them that you really understand by having a vegan holiday, or better yet, going vegan yourself – it would be the greatest gift you could possibly give your vegan loved one and the animals who will no longer be harmed.

Casey is co-owner of Vegan Publishers, Professor of Psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine, and staff psychologist at the National Center for PTSD in the VA Boston Healthcare System. He’s an internationally recognized researcher in the area of violence prevention, winning prestigious awards for his work from the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies, the Institute on Violence, Abuse and Trauma, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He has published over 100 journal articles, book chapters, and scientific reports, and has a book forthcoming on trauma-informed violence prevention, published by the American Psychological Association.

Order a FREE vegan kit: http://www.peta.org/living/food/free-vegan-starter-kit/

Take PETA’s Cruelty-Free Shopping Guide along with you next time you head to the store! The handy guide will help you find humane products at a glance. Order a FREE copy HERE

Want to do more than go vegan? Help others to do so! Click on the below for nominal, or no, fees to vegan literature that you can use to convince others that veganism is the only compassionate route to being an animal friend.

PETA: http://www.petacatalog.com/catalog/Literature-39-1.html

Looking for merchandise? Action for Animals has a very good sele : http://store.afa-online.org/home.php?cat=284

Have questions? Click HERE

Read more…

Jet Eliot

Travel and Wildlife Adventures

Organic Opinion

Finding it, aye there's the rub~

The Year(s) of Living Non-Judgmentally

Here and now, with all of it.

Eat No Harm

Living consciously for our planet, the animals, and ourselves.

Flawless Pandemonium

Question everything~

Veganism is Nonviolence

Being Vegan Is A First Step To A Nonviolent Life

The Biotrotter

The Globetrotting Biologists

Sophie's Foodie Files

Mostly healthy & tasty colourful cooking with Sophie's twist!

Let Me Reach with Kim Saeed

Surviving Narcissistic Abuse | No Contact | Narcissists and Lying | Narcissistic Husband | Love Bombing | Cognitive Dissonance

Steal This Meme

humans' vegan past & future. SHIRIN - Subvert Human Irrationalities, Rediscover Innate Nature

Gillian Prew

poetry 100% vegan

Nepali Today

Coffee break Photo Blogs Base In Tokyo, Japan.

veganomics

making the link between our food, our health, our society, our environment and our economy

Friendly Fairy Tales

Fairy Tales and Poetry Celebrating Magic and Nature for Kids of all Ages

Arcilla y fuego

Una visión sobre el complejo y apasionante mundo de la cerámica

Gotta Find a Home

Conversations with Street People

Cindy Knoke

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,070 other followers